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Civil War Harper's Weekly, October 14, 1865

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $195.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

 

 

 

VOL. IX.ŚNo. 459.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1865.

[SINGLE COPIES TEN CENTS. $4,00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1865, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


ANDREW JOHNSON'S TAILOR-SHOP IN GREENVILLE, TENNESSEE.Ś[PHOTOGRAPHED BY J. B. REEF.]

PARDON-SEEKERS AT THE
WHITE HOUSE.

WE print on this page two engravings pertaining to two very different periods in the life of President ANDREW JOHNSON. The first is a picture of the tailor-shop in Greenville, East Tennessee, where as a young man he labored at his trade. One of his comrades, still living, says that JOHNSON could beat him at making a coat, though his spelling was rather below the mark. But the future President mended in the matter of spelling after he married, as we all know, and has rather outstripped his old comrade. Our second illustration represents President JOHNSON in the attitude of pardoning rebels who have returned to their allegiance. Hundreds of these pardon-seekers daily besiege the White House. They crowd into the ante-room and are ushered into the President's presence each in his turn, and if found all right on the record they are pardoned, otherwise not.

THE LATE CAPTAIN MARSHALL.

CAPTAIN CHARLES H. MARSHALL, recently de-ceased, was a native of this State. He was born in North Easton, Washington County, in 1792, and at the time of his death, which took place at his residence in Fourteenth Street in this city on the 23d ult., was in the seventy-fourth year of his age ; and when dying was in the full possession of all his faculties, and surrounded by his children. He died as he had lived, a sincere Christian and a true patriot.

At the age of fifteen, a mere stripling, and in apparent delicate health, weighing then but 96 pounds, he left the family homestead in the Mohawk Valley

, with but fifteen dollars in his pocket, to seek his fortune on the ocean. He reached Albany, walking

 there on foot for many miles, and took passage on a sloop to New York, which it took the sloop

nearly eight days to reach ! Steam motion and railways were then scarcely thought of. Looking about this city, which at that time contained a population of only some thirty or forty thousand, he could find no vessel to gratify his desire for a sailor's life, and went to Nantucket, where the whaling business afforded to the young and daring adventurer an opportunity for the exercise of his talents. We find him at the age of twenty-six in the command of the ship Julius Caesar; then taking a command in the " Old Line" of Liverpool packets, and commanding and building the most splendid ships in that trade.

ISAAC WRIGHT & SON had established the " Old Line" in 1819. THOMPSON & ODDIE succeeded them ; and when the "Old Line" had not fulfilled the expectations of those who were interested, GOODHUE & COMPANY, Captain CHARLES H. MARSHALL, and the other owners, bought it out, and placed the agency of it in the hands of the subject of this sketch. How well and how faithfully he discharged his du-ties is familiar to all interested in that line. To keep pace with all the improvements in navigation, to compete successfully with foreign vessels, and to avail himself of the genius and skill of American ship-builders, he secured WILLIAM H. WEBB to construct his ships, and under this great marine architect he successively had built for him the ships Europe, Columbia, Manhattan, Fidelia, Webb, Great Western, Montezuma, and several other pack-et ships, thereby giving a great impulse to American navigation.

Captain MARSHALL became a member of the Chamber of Commerce many years since, and has been an active and efficient member, rendering substantial aid to the Government. The Marine Society, of which he was the Presi-

PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON PARDONING REBELS AT THE WHITE HOUSE.- [SKETCHED BY MR. STANLEY FOX.]

Picture
Andrew Johnson House
Andrew Johnson Civil War Pardons

 

 

  

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