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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 29, 1865

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $195.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

 

 

 

VOL. IX.—No. 448.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1865.

[SINGLE COPIES TEN CENTS. $4,00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1865, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


FOURTH OF JULY AT ALBANY
AND SARATOGA.

THE facts that General GRANT was to be present at Albany on the Fourth rendered that place a great centre of attraction during that day.

The ceremonies of the day took place on the Washington Parade-Ground. Besides the Lieutenant-General, several other distinguished military men were present, among whom were Generals SCHOFIELD, HUNTER, KAUTZ, KILPATRICK, and SICKLES. Having arrived on the Parade-Ground, after the prayer and the reading of the Declaration General BUTTERFIELD presented to the Government

and people of New York two hundred battle-flags, accompanying the presentation with an eloquent speech. Governor FENTON was too weak to de-liver the responsive address, which was read by his private secretary. The oration of the day was pronounced by Dr. E. H. CHAPIN. After the oration, which was one of CHAPIN'S finest efforts, there was the usual rush after General GRANT, who with difficulty fought his way to his carriage. We give an illustration of the presentation of the flags on page 468.

Independence Day was celebrated at Saratoga also under brilliant auspices, being made the occasion for a grand reunion of the Army of Tennessee.

The most noticeable characteristic of the celebration here was the absence of noise, the city government, frightened by the late fires, having forbidden the ignition of gunpowder in any shape during the day. The reunion of the army took place at LE-LAND'S Union Hotel. Most of the officers who had been at Albany were present at the grand dinner which the LELANDS gave to the army. WILLIAM Ross WALLACE recited a poem on the occasion. We give an illustration of the dinner on page 468. We publish also on page 469 three other illustrations—one of the ball which took place in the evening in the new Opera House just completed by the Messrs. LELANDS, another of the drive to Saratoga

Lake, and the third gives a fine view of the Lake it-self. Saratoga Lake is three and one half miles from the town, and has on its borders several hotels. Pickerel, perch, and other fish abound in the Lake, and the disciples of WALTON can here indulge to their heart's content in their favorite amusement. This Lake is the favorite resort of the visitors at the Springs, and is the terminus of the best drives about the town. On the Fourth these drives were frequented by a large number of fashionable turn-outs. It would not tend to diminish the pleasures of Independence Day if it were always and every where celebrated with the quietness which characterized the celebration this year at Saratoga.

PORTIA.—" Which is the Merchant here, and which the jew?"—SHAKESPEARE.

THE GREAT LABOR QUESTION FROM A SOUTHERN POINT OF VIEW.—[BY JOHN.]

Picture
Emancipated Slave

 

 

  

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