Battle of Moore's Creek

 

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Moore's Creek Bridge, BATTLE AT. In January, 1776, Sir Henry Clinton sailed from Boston on a secret mission. Suspecting his destination to be New York, George Washington sent General Lee thither. His presence probably deterred Clinton from landing, after a conference with Governor Tryon, and he proceeded to the coast of North Carolina to assist Governor Martin in the recovery of his power in that province. Martin, aware of his approach, and anticipating an armament from Ireland, kept up a continual intercourse from his "floating palace" on the Cape Fear with the Scotch Highlanders (who had settled in large numbers in that province) and other Tories. He commissioned Donald McDonald brigadier-general. He was a veteran who had fought for the Young Pretender at the battle of Culloden (1746). Under him, as captain, was Allan McDonald. These two men had great influence over the Scotch Highlanders. They enlisted for the royal cause about 1,500 men, and marched from the vicinity of Fayetteville for the coast to join the governor and his friends on the Cape Fear. Colonel James Moore, on hearing of this movement, marched with more than 1,000 men to intercept McDonald. At the same time minutemen of the Neuse region, under Colonels Caswell and Lillington, were gathering to oppose the loyalists, and on the evening of February 26 were encamped at a bridge near the mouth of Moore's Creek, in Hanover county. There McDonald, chased by Colonel Moore, came upon the minutemen. He was sick, and the force was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel McLeod. A sharp battle ensued the next morning, when McLeod was killed. The Scotchmen were routed and dispersed, and about 850 of them were made prisoners, among them the two McDonalds. The loyalists lost seventy men, killed and wounded. The republicans had only two wounded, one mortally.

 

 

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