Battle of Hanging Rock

 

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Hanging RockHanging Rock, ACTION AT. After his unsuccessful attack on Rocky Mount, Colonel Sumter crossed the Catawba, and fell upon a British post at Hanging Rock, 12 miles east of the river, August 6, 1780, commanded by Major Carden. A large number of British and Tories were there. Among the former were the infantry of Tarleton's Legion. Sumter soon dispersed them, when his men scattered through the camp, seeking plunder and drinking the liquors found there. Intoxication followed. The British rallied, and attacked the disordered patriots, and a severe skirmish ensued. The British were reinforced, and Sumter was compelled to retreat; but the British had been so severely handled that they did not attempt to pursue. With a few prisoners and some booty, Sumter retreated towards the Waxhaw, bearing away many of his wounded men. The battle lasted about four hours. Sumter lost twelve killed and forty-one wounded. At the same time Marion was smiting the British and Tories with sudden and fierce blows among the swamps of the lower country, on the borders of the Pedee; Pickens was annoying Cruger near the Saluda, and Clarke was calling for the patriots along the Savannah and other Georgia streams to drive Brown from Augusta. Hanging Rock is a huge conglomerate bolder near the Lancaster and Camden highway, a few miles east of the Catawba River, in South Carolina. It is a shelving rock, 20 or 30 feet in diameter, lying on the verge of a high bank of a small stream, nearly 100 feet above it. Under its concavity fifty men might find shelter from rain.

 

 

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