Quotes of George Washington

 

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George Wahington Kneeling in Prayer

While I reiterate the professions of my dependence upon Heaven, as the source of all public and private blessings, I will observe, that the general prevalence of piety, philanthropy, honesty, industry, and economy seems, in the ordinary course of human affairs, particularly necessary for advancing and confirming the happiness of our country.

Letter from George Washington to the Presbyterian Church, 1789

 

I receive reproof when reproof is due, because no person can be readier to accuse me, than I am to acknowledge an error, when I have committed it.

Report from George Washington to the Lieutenant Gov. of Virginia, 1757

 

 No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand, which conducts the affairs of men, more than the people of the United States. Every step, by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency.

George Washington's First Inaugural Address

 

I must assure you in particular that I take in the kindest part the promise you make of presenting your prayers at the throne of grace for me.

Letter from George Washington to the Presbyterian Church, 1789

 

If such talents as I possess have been called into action by great events, and those events have terminated happily for our country, the glory should be ascribed to the manifest interposition of an overruling Providence.

Letter from George Washington to the Reformed Dutch Church, 1789

 

The propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained

George Washington, First Inaugural Speech

 

America, under the smiles of Divine Providence, the protection of a good government, the cultivation of manners; morals, and piety, can hardly fail of attaining an uncommon degree of eminence in literature, commerce, agriculture, improvements at home, and respectability abroad.

Letter from George Washington to the Catholic Church, 1789

 

I sincerely wish, gentlemen, that you may in your social and individual capacities taste those blessings which a gracious God bestows upon the righteous.

Letter from George Washington to the Baltimore Church, 1793

 

 

 

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