Robert E. Lee Obituary

 

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Robert E. Lee Obiturary

Robert E. Lee Biography | Robert E. Lee Quotes | Robert E. Lee Pictures | Robert E. Lee's Childhood | Robert E. Lee in Texas | Robert E. Lee's Religious Views | Lee on Slavery | Robert E. Lee's Farewell | Lee's Recollections & Letters | To His Son | To His Daughter | Robert E. Lee in Harper's Weekly | Lee Time Line | Lee Obituary | Robert E. Lee's Slave | Lee's Essential Writings | Lee's Surrender at Appomattox | Lee's Daughter Arrested | Lee's Nicknames | Robert E. Lee's Position on Arming the Slaves | Robert E. Lee Digital Library 

Robert E. Lee Tomb

Upon Lee’s death the New York Herald wrote an obituary. It reads as follows.

The Robert E. Lee Obituary


On a quiet autumn morning, in the land which he loved so well and served so faithfully, the spirit of Robert Edward Lee left the clay which it had so much ennobled and traveled out of this world into the great and mysterious land. Here in the North, forgetting that the time was when the sword of Robert Edward Lee was drawn against us—forgetting and forgiving all the years of bloodshed and agony—we have long since ceased to look upon him as the Confederate leader, but have claimed him as one of ourselves; have cherished and felt proud of his military genius; have recounted and recorded his triumphs as our own; have extolled his virtue as reflecting upon us—for Robert Edward Lee was an American, and the great nation which gave him birth would be today unworthy of such a son if she regarded him lightly.

“Never had mother a nobler son. In him the military genius of America was developed to a greater extent than ever before. In him all that was pure and lofty in mind and purpose found lodgment. Dignified without presumption, affable without familiarity, he united all those charms of manners which made him the idol of his friends and of his soldiers and won for him the respect and admiration of the world. Even as in the days of triumph, glory did not intoxicate, so, when the dark clouds swept over him, adversity did not depress.

 

 

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