Richmond

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 18, 1862

This WEB site features online, readable versions of the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These old newspapers have a variety of incredible pictures, and in depth analysis of the key people, battles, and events in the Civil War.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Port Royal

The Battle of Port Royal

Port Royal Battle

Trent Affair

Release of Slidell and Mason

General Burnside

General Burnside

Richmond

Richmond Story

Civil War Prisoners

Richmond Prison

Trent Affair

Trent Affair Cartoon

Burnside Expedition

General Burnside's Expedition

Skating Season

Skating Season

Richmond, Virginia

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JANUARY 18, 1862.

38

BUILDING HUTS FOR THE ARMY ON THE POTOMAC—[SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.]

THE CITY OF RICHMOND, VA.

ON pages 40 and 41 we publish a large view of the CITY OF RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, the capital of the pretended rebel Confederacy.

Richmond is situated on the James River, 23 miles north of Petersburg, 113 south by west of

Washington, and about 150 miles from the mouth of the river. Its population in 1854 was 30,000 ; its exports about $3,000,000, chiefly wheat and tobacco. A gentleman who visited Richmond last summer gave the Herald an account of what he saw, and we subjoin the following extracts from his narrative ;

The principal feature that strikes every one who sees Richmond for the first time is its curious topography. From the James River, which, tumbling over its rocky bed, makes a wide bend here, with its convex face to the city, rise, without any regard to uniformity of direction, some half dozen hills, of gravel formation and of pretty considerable elevation. There has never been any attempt to grade them into level streets, but the city is scattered promiscuously up and on and over them, just as fashion,

taste, or business may have happened to dictate. The principal part of the city, however, occupies actually only one of those elevations, and the garden spot of that one is the Capitol Square, where stands the building of which Jefferson procured the design in France, but which, however magnificent it may have been deemed in the simple, unostentatious days in which it was built., is certainly not to be lauded now either for its beauty or for its adaptation to the wants of a State Legislature, much less to those of  (Next Page)

THE WAR IN VIRGINIA—A RECONNOISSANCE IN A LAUREL-BRAKE.

Army of the Potomac
War in Virginia

 

 

  

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