Daniel Butterfield

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, February 14, 1863

Harper's Weekly was the most popular newspaper published during the Civil War. We have acquired a complete run of these newspapers, and have posted them on this WEB site for your enjoyment. These amazing papers allow you to really drill down and develop new perspective on the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Soldier

Union Soldier

Only One Man Killed Today Poem

Burnside Commentary

Commentary on General Burnside

Atlantic Sea-Board

Atlantic Sea-Board Map

Battle Bayou Teche

Battle of Bayou Teche

Daniel Butterfield

General Daniel Butterfield

General Butterfield Biography

Jim Crow

Jim Crow

Savannah Scenes

Scenes Around Savannah, Georgia

Bayou Teche, Louisiana

Bayou Teche

Murfreesboro

Battle of Murfreesboro

Crossing the Rappahannock

Crossing the Rappahannock River

 

 

FEBRUARY 14, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

109

MAJOR-GENERAL DARIUS N. COUCH, COMMANDING THE RIGHT GRAND DIVISION OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

MAJOR-GENERAL DANIEL BUTTERFIELD, CHIEF OF STAFF TO GENERAL HOOKER.
[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

GENERALS COUCH AND BUTTERFIELD.

WE publish herewith, from photographs by

Brady, portraits of GENERAL DARIUS N. COUCH, General Sumner's successor in command of the Right Grand Division of the Army of the Potomac, and of GENERAL DANIEL BUTTERFIELD, Chief of Staff to General Hooker. Both are fine-looking military men, and will make themselves heard of. We subjoin the following sketches of their lives:

GENERAL COUCH.

General Darius N. Couch was born in New York about the year 1826, entered West Point in 1842, graduated in the artillery in 1846, and went with his regiment (the Second Artillery) to Mexico. At the battle of Buena Vista he was brevetted First Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct. At the close of the war Lieutenant Couch resigned his rank in the army and settled in Massachusetts. At the outbreak of the rebellion he joined the Volunteers, and left Boston at the head of a well-appointed regiment. In May, 1861, he was appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers. In all the battles on the Peninsula General Couch proved himself a gallant and able soldier; and when General Sumner resigned there was little hesitation in appointing him to the vacancy.

GENERAL BUTTERFIELD.

In the dark days of April, 1861, when the capital was in danger and the existence of the Government doubtful, one of the earliest, if not the first, to hasten to Washington with a tender of his services was Daniel Butterfield, commanding the Twelfth Regiment New York Militia. He found an attack momentarily expected, and an organization of visitors and citizens hastily formed, known as the Clay Guard, for the protection of the city from the hard-riding and hard-drinking cavaliers promised for its "subjugation" by "Wise the Witless." Colonel Butterfield enrolled himself at once, and many senators, judges, lawyers, and distinguished citizens who served as privates in the ranks of the Clay Guard on the memorable nights of the 17th and 18th of April will remember him in the

young orderly-sergeant who drilled them, and watch his career with additional interest as a commander on a larger field. While engaged in this sacred duty Colonel Butterfield had obtained the permission of the Secretary of War to reorganize, fill up, and report his regiment at Washington on the 26th, prepared for duty. With this order Colonel Butterfield made his way through Baltimore, wet with the gore of Northern citizens shed by "plug uglydom" turned "secesh" in its mad frenzy, and over broken bridges and torn up tracks arrived in New York on Thursday night of the 20th, filled up his regiment (like most of our militia organizations then merely a skeleton) from some 350 to 1000 men, and left with them on Sunday afternoon in the Baltic, bound for Washington, by the way of Fortress Monroe, looking to a passage up the Potomac; and then, by information there obtained, to Annapolis. (Next Page)

GENERAL STONEWALL JACKSON IN CAMP.—FROM A DRAWING BY MR. VIZETELLY, INTERCEPTED BY OUR BLOCKADING FLEET OFF CHARLESTON.—[SEE PAGE 103.]

General Couch
Daniel Butterfield
Stonewall Jackson Camp

 

 

 

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