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Civil War Harper's Weekly, April 9, 1864

Welcome to our archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers. Harper's Weekly was the most read newspaper during the Civil War, and served as the primary source of news for people during the War. The paper was read by millions of Americans, and today serves as a primary source for research into the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Metropolitan Fair

New York Metropolitan Fair

Democrats Slavery vote

Democrats Vote Against Abolishing Slavery

Forrest's Attack of Union City

General Forrest's Attack on Union City

New York Fair

New York Fair

Knoxville in the Civil War

Slaves Escape From South

Hair Style Cartoon

 

Sanitary Commission

Sanitary Commission

Knoxville

Knoxville, Tennessee

Soldier's Ball in Huntsville

Soldier's Ball in Huntsville

Runaway Slaves

Runaway Slaves

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[ APRIL 9, 1864.

228

METROPOLITAN FAIR BUILDINGS, ON UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK.

THE UNITED STATES SANITARY
COMMISSION.

THE United States Sanitary Commission, originated in that spirit of sympathy with the army which has so embellished with bright deeds the darkest pages of our sad conflict with rebellion, was never more necessary, as an ameliorating agency, than at this time, when all along the lines preparations are making for active hostilities, which will probably involve greater suffering and loss than any previous campaign. It is the appreciation, no doubt, of this possibility that is now impelling the people, every where, to unprecedented efforts in aid of its funds. The entire money receipts of the Commission, since its organization, probably exceed $2,000,000, while the money value of the supplies

poured in by the women of the country can not be less than $9,000,000. The management of the Commission has been, from the start, most economical and efficient. Rev. Dr. BELLOWS, who is at its head, and whose portrait we give on this page, has given himself to this work with an industry and zealous self-sacrifice which the whole country will applaud long after the tumult and the sufferings of war have ceased from the land. Dr. BELLOWS is about to proceed to California for the purpose of laboring there in aid of the Commission, in place of the late Rev. THOMAS STARR KING, whose death left it without any special agent in that rich field.

THE METROPOLITAN FAIR.

The Metropolitan Fair, in aid of this Commission, will undoubtedly surpass, in the magnitude of its display and the aggregate of results, all previous

efforts in a similar direction. The preparations for the Fair have been made on the most extended scale, exhibiting the most liberal purpose on the part of the managers, who manifestly feel that the people will equal, in their generous giving, the largest possible expectations. Contributions are still flowing in from all parts of the world, Americans every where seeming to rejoice at the opportunity to show their sympathy with the men who are defending the cause of liberty and good government. Nor are contributions from abroad confined to Americans away from home. Thousands of foreigners, who look to America as the beacon-light of the nations, are sending their offerings in most liberal profusion. The steamship Germania, which arrived from Hamburg on the 24th ult., brought many costly gifts from the citizens of Hamburg, who, notwithstanding the excitement consequent on the Schles-

wig-Holstein war, find time to give practical expression to their interest in our brave soldiers. From Italy, Switzerland, and other far lands, similar contributions have been received, and in the Fair will appear as so many testimonies of the sincerity of foreign sympathy with the loyal men of the nation in their struggle with barbarism.

General JOHN A. Dix, whose portrait we give on this page, is President of the Fair Association. It is fit that a soldier should thus head the movement of the great city of New York in behalf of the army upon which the future of the nation so largely depends. General Dix is now nearly sixty-six years of age, and during his life has filled many positions of honor and trust, but in none has he proved himself a sturdier patriot and truer man than in this contest, on the peace side of which he now appears as the head of our Fair.

MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN A. DIX, PRESIDENT OF THE METROPOLITAN FAIR.
(PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.)

REV. HENRY W. BELLOWS, D ,D., PRESIDENT UNITED STATE SANITARY COMMISSION,
[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY)

Metropolitan Fair
General John Dix
Henry Bellows

 

 

  

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