Blockade of Wilmington

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, December 3, 1864

This site contains our entire collection of Harper's Weekly newspapers. These papers contain incredible content, and allow the serious student of the war to gain new insights into the key events of the war. The reports were written by eye-witnesses within hours of the events depicted.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Martinsburg

Martinsburg

Peace

Prospect of Peace

General Birney

Death of General Birney

Wilmington Blockade

Blockade of Wilmington

Pittsburg Tunnel

Pittsburg Tunnel

Fat Soldiers

Fat Soldiers Cartoon

 

 

Wilmington

Wilmington, North Carolina

United We Stand

Thanksgiving Day

Martinsburg

Martinsburg, Virginia

 

 

DECEMBER 3, 1864.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

773

How-qua. Alabama's Launch.

 Wilderness.

Ninhon.

Annie.

Kansas.

Alabama.

CAPTURE OF THE BLOCKADE RUNNER "ANNIE," OCTOBER 31, 1864.--[SKETCHED BY CHARLES F. ELLMORE.]

THE LATE MR. JOHN LEECH.

JOHN LEECH, celebrated as the best humorous draughtsman of Punch, died on the 29th of October, at the age of forty-seven. The record of his life is short and simple. He was born in London in 1817, and was educated at the Charter-house. His first efforts as an artist appeared in Bell's Life in London, with which he was connected for two years. Among these early works the best was a series of sketches of the droller aspects of Parisian life. His first sketch in Punch, entitled " Foreign Affairs," appeared in 1841, and from that date to his death he has contributed almost every week to its pages. These weekly sketches, with etchings in Bentley's Miscellany, a few illustrations of works of fiction, and a yearly installment of Christmas Sketches, have reflected to the world the graceful thought and hu

mor of this wonderful artist for more than twenty years. His sketches of English social life his pictures of balls, dinner parties, mess rooms, bachelors' chambers, Rotten row, gardens, parks, streets, watering places, shooting parties, hunting fields, boating, fishing, and we know not what else, make up such a history of his time as to the future historian will be invaluable.

Mr. LEECH was a careful, patient workman ; and there is no doubt that his incessant brain work exhausted too far his nervous organization, which was as delicate as his fancy was exquisite and refined. Toward the last of his life he suffered greatly from sleeplessness. He was much affected by noise, and was literally driven from his house in Brunswick Square to Kensington by street music. Less than a year ago he stood by the grave of THACKERAY, his school fellow and friend, overcome with uncon-

trollable grief. Now be himself has been called, and the news of his departure will quench the Christmas mirth of thousands of loving friends.

THE BLOCKADE OFF WILMINGTON.

WE illustrate on this page the capture of the blockade-runner Annie, October 31, off Wilmington, by the launch of the United States steamer Alabama. This launch, mounting a 12-pound rifled howitzer, was doing picket duty off the her at New Inlet, one of the two entrances to Wilmington. About half past seven, on the night of the 31st, a steamer was seen coming out, and heading directly for the launch. Fire was immediately opened on this vessel, the seemed shot taking effect in her port quar

ter; when the gun-boats Wilderness and Niphon gave chase, and soon signaled back to the launch that the vessel was captured. The prize proved to be the Annie, laden with 550 bales of cotton and 40 tons of tobacco, and having on board a crew of about 60 persons. This is the first vessel ever captured under the guns of Fort Fisher. The launch which effected this capture is the only vessel of the kind in the fleet.

We give also on page 772 two illustrations representing the two inlets to Wilmington harbor, and our blockading fleets at each of these inlets. The rebels have lately been extending their fortifications along the coast, placing a battery at every available point. The Cape Fear River has also been filled with obstructions. The approaches to Fort Fisher, the most formidable of the defensive works, are protected be heavy shore batteries.

THE LATE MR. JOHN LEECH,

THE GREAT TUNNEL UNDER PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA.—SKETCHED BY DAVIS.--[SEE PAGE 778.]

Capture of Blockade Runner
John Leech
Pittsburg Tunnel

 

 

  

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