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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 9, 1864

During the Civil War, people on the home front relied on Harper's Weekly for news of the War. The paper was the most popular newspaper of the day, and was distributed across the country. Today, it is popular with students and researchers seeking a better understanding of the important people and issues in the war.

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444

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JULY 9, 1864.

GENERAL SHERMAN'S CAMPAIGN—"BIG SHANTY STATION"—GENERAL LOGAN'S ADVANCE, JUNE 10, 1864.—[SKETCHED BY THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

GEN. SHERMAN'S CAMPAIGN.

THE MILITARY TELEGRAPH of the Army of the Cumberland, which we illustrate below, and which is under the command of Captain VAN DUZER, has proved an invaluable acquisition to General SHERMAN and to the North. We have by this

means been in daily receipt of news from our armies in the West. Captain VAN DUZER surprised General SHERMAN shortly after he had occupied Ackworth by the information that the wires were working, and Washington was but one hour distant. The town of Ackworth is small, few of its inhabitants being at this time in it, since every

man has been taken off by the army, and. the female portion of the inhabitants were timid about remaining. Ackworth is on the Western and Atlantic Railroad, a few miles northwest of Marietta. Sherman reached this point on the 6th of June.

"BIG SHANTY," also illustrated on this page, although dull enough in ordinary times, is likely for

some days to come, as the resting-place of SHERMAN'S army, to present scenes of the intensest activity. In front of the place, along the range of Lost and Kenesaw mountains, the enemy lies in force, until the combination of the Federal commander and the prowess of the Union army shall compel him to take another step southward.

GENERAL SHERMAN'S CAMPAIGN—MILITARY TELEGRAPH TO ACKWORTH, GEORGIA.—[SKETCHED BY THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

Big Shanty Station
Telegraph

 

 

  

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