General Sedgwick

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 28, 1864

Welcome to our online collection of Harper's Weekly newspapers. We have posted over 2,000 pages of this incredible newspapers. Studying these pages will enable you to gain new insights into the war. This is the most extensive collection readily available on the internet.

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General Hancock

General Hancock

Dead Heroes

Dead Heroes

Wilderness

Battle of the Wilderness

General U.S. Grant

Virginia

Virginia

Rapidan

Crossing Rapidan

Sedgwick

General Sedgwick

Paris Fashion

Paris Fashion

Battle Wilderness

Battle of the Wilderness

Sleeping

Sleeping Soldiers

Georgia

Georgia Map

Garibaldi

Garibaldi

 

 

 

349

MAY 28, 1864.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

THE LATE MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN SEDGWICK.--PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

THE LATE GENERAL JAMES C. RICE.

GENERAL JAMES C. RICE.

BRIGADIER-GENERAL JAMES C. RICE, whose portrait we give above, was one of the bravest and truest men in the Army of the Potomac—a Christian soldier in the best sense of the phrase. He was born in Worthington, in the hill-country of Massachusetts; was a graduate of Yale College; practiced law for some years, first in Natchez, Mississippi, and later in this city; and entered the army as a private soldier when the war broke out. He rose, through his own merits and bravery, from this position to that of Brigadier-General. He fought in

every battle in which the Army of the Potomac was engaged except that of Antietam, from which he was absent by reason of a severe attack of typhoid fever. At Gettysburg he distinguished himself, as Colonel commanding a brigade, on the left of our line, and was appointed Brigadier at the request of General MEADE. He was, in battle, constantly in the front, and exposed himself without stint ; but he was never hit but once, and that was fatally, in the battle of Tuesday, though in almost every battle he received bullets in his clothes or hat. At Malvern six bullets passed through his clothing. General RICE was a consistent and zealous Christian, a man

devoted heart and soul to his country, and ready at all times to make the greatest sacrifices for the cause of Union and Liberty.

MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN
SEDGWICK.

THE " Fighting Sixth" has lost its General. The portrait of this, the oldest of the corps commanders of the Army of the Potomac, we give on this page. JOHN SEDGWICK was born in Connecticut in 1817, graduated at West Point in 1837, went into

the artillery, in 1839 was made First Lieutenant, was brevetted Captain for gallantry at Contreras and Churubusco, and Major in Molino del Rey, Chapultepec, and San Cosme Gate ; the former brevet was confirmed by commission in 1849, and the latter in 1855. In 1861, he entered this present conflict as Colonel of the First Cavalry, and, August 4, was made Brigadier-General of Volunteers. His commission as Major-General dated from July 4, 1862.

A very modest man was General SEDGWICK; but he was the idol of his Corps, who all called him "Uncle John," and his intrinsic worth as a soldier was (Next Page)

PARIS FASHIONS FOR MAY, 1864.-[SEE PAGE 350.]

General Sedgwick
Gerneal Rice
Fashion

 

 

  

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