Nathan Bedford Forrest's Memphis Raid

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, September 10, 1864

Harper's Weekly was the most popular illustrated newspaper of the Civil War period. Many Americans relied on Harper's for news of the war each week. The paper was read by over a million people each wee. Today, you can get this same news by browsing our online collection.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

McCloskey

Archbishop McCloskey

1864 Presidential Campaign

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Water Spout

Water Spout

Metacomet and Selma

Nathan Forrest Raid

Nathan Bedford Forrest Memphis Raid

General John Geary

General John Geary

Wall Street Cartoon

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Virginia Map

Map of Grant's Virginia Campaign

Tennessee

Rebel Ironclad Ram "Tennessee"

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[SEPTEMBER 10, 1864.

588

FORREST'S RAID INTO MEMPHIS—THE REBELS AT THE GAYOSO HOUSE.—[SKETCHED BY GEORGE H. ELLSBURY.]

FORREST'S RAID.

ON Monday, August 22, the rebel General FORREST made a daring raid into Memphis, Tennessee, which is illustrated in the accompanying sketches. The expedition was commanded by FORREST in person, and consisted of portions of eight or nine cavalry regiments, mostly from Tennessee, and numbering from 1500 to 2000 strong. Arriving at Beal Street, the rebels divided off in several squads and struck for the Gayoso House, Hospitals, Irving Block, and General WASHBURNE'S headquarters on Union Street. The latter was first visited by a force of about two hundred, under Lieutenant- Colonel JESSE FORREST, who entered and found it deserted, the General and his staff having but a moment before escaped. JESSE captured the General's over-coat, and started for the Gayoso

 House with his valiant horsemen, who rode right into the office of the hotel in search of General HURLBURT, who had also escaped. A portion of the rebel force then proceeded to break open Irving Prison, in order to release the prisoners there confined.—But the guard resisted them, and was assisted by the fortunate arrival at the right moment of the Eighth Iowa regiment. A bout 6 A.M. the rebels left the town, finding it growing too hot for them, having accomplished the capture of 200 citizens and about 100 horses, and having butchered all the negroes they could find in in the streets. There was little plundering; indeed the rebels had orders not to dismount under penalty of being shot. The rebels suffered heavily. Their object appears to have been the capture of Generals WASHBURNE and HURLBURT.

FORREST'S RAID INTO MEMPHIS--ESCAPE OF GENERAL WASHBURNE.—[SKETCHED BY GEORGE H. ELLSBURY.]

FORREST'S RAID INTO MEMPHIS—REBEL ATTACK ON THE IRVING PRISON.—[SKETCHED BY GEORGE H. ELLSBURY.]

Forrest on Horseback
Picture
Forrest's Memphis Raid

 

 

  

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