Civil War Pictures of Fort Moultrie

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 26, 1861

Other Pages from this Newspaper Include:

Fortress Moultrie | First Shot of the Civil War | 

Civil War Pictures of Fort Moultrie | 

Shots at the Star of the West | 

Civil War Illustration of Fort Sumter | 

The Guns of Fort Sumter | Charleston During the Civil War 

Civil War Charleston Story | 

Civil War Scenes of Fort Sumter | More Civil War News

Below we present a leaf from the January 26, 1861 edition of Harper's Weekly. This leaf was printed just as the Civil War was getting underway.  It presents incredible images of scenes around Fort Moultrie, made by an eye-witness to the events depicted.  (A note to our readers: We acquired this original, 140+ year old leaf for the purpose of digitally archiving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original leaf, it is available at a price of $150.  Your purchase allows us to secure additional material to archive on this site)

 

 

JANUARY 26, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

53

GROUP OF GUNS AND GUN CARRIAGES DISMANTLED BY MAJOR ANDERSON AT FORT MOULTRIE.--DRAWN BY AN OFFICER OF HIS COMMAND.— [SEE PAGE 50.]

BATTERY AT FORT MOULTRIE, BEARING ON FORT SUMTER.—DRAWN BY AN OFFICER OF MAJOR ANDERSON'S COMMAND.—[SEE PAGE 50.]

THE DEATH OF CENONE.

Now many a rolling month was gone, And years were past away,

And Paris he dwelt in merry Troy town, Ile and his lady gay.

 

The lady CEnone sate in her bower,

Nursing her sorrow and teen ; Ivy and briony twined her round,

And vine-leaves nodded between.

All pale and wan was that lone lady, And thrice she deeply sighed :

'Tis long, 'tis long for a knight to be Away from his own true bride.

" But here yestreen came the wild woman, That redeth things to come,

And up the mountain-side she ran,

And away from her Trojan home.

" She spite me words so keen, so keen,

And shriek'd one deadly shriek : And now I know the town below

Will fall by hand of Greek.

" And they will slay my traitor lord,

Their hands in his blood they will wet : Now, by my fay," said the lone lady,

" I'll save my shepherd yet."

 

With that she clapt her lily-white hands, Her lily-white hands clapt she,

And to her came running her sweet young son, The boy was fair to see.

All men might tell that scann'd him well He came of a royal race

By the eyes below his forehead of snow, And the light of his godlike face.

Twice seven summers on Ida hill,

And all with his lone, lone mother; And all with the goats and painted pards, For a sister and a brother.

"Now hie thee, hie thee, my winsome lad, And tell your traitor sire,

The Greek will take Troy town so gay, And burn it in the fire.

" The wild woman she read it to me, In sooth as I you say :

And yet there are days but two and three And the Greek will have his way.

"SHE LOOK'D ON HIM DYING—TIE SHEPHERD SHE KNEW –"

"AND DOWN SCAMANDER TWO SILENT GHOSTS...

Damaged Guns at Fort Moultrie
Guns of Fort Moultrie
Picture
Picture

 

 

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