Battle of Monterey

 

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Mexican War Time Line | Map of the Mexican War | Mexico | President Polk | Zachary Taylor | Santa Anna | General Winfield Scott | General William Worth | General John Wool | General Stephen Kearny | Commodore Stockton | John C. Fremont | General David Twiggs | Nicholas Trist | Thornton Affair | Battle of Palo Alto | Battle of Resace De La Palma | Battle of Monterey | Battle of Buena Vista | Battle of Vera Cruz | Battle of Cerro Gordo | Battle of Contreras | Battle of Churubusco | Battle of El Molino Del Rey | Battle of Chapultepec

MONTEREY, BATTLE OF. After General Taylor had entered Mexico at Matamoras, he remained there until September, waiting for further instructions from his government and reinforcements for his army. Early in September the first division of his army, under General W. J. Worth, moved towards Monterey, the capital of New Leon, which was strongly fortified, and then defended by General Ampudia with about 9,000 Mexican troops. Taylor soon joined Worth, and they encamped within 3 miles of the city, on Sept. 19, with about 7,000 men, and on the morning of the 21st attacked the stronghold. Joined by other divisions of the army, the assault became general on the 23d, and the conflict in the streets was dreadful.

General Zachary Taylor

General Zachary Taylor

The Mexicans fired volleys of musketry from the windows of the strong storehouses upon the invaders, and the carnage was terrible. Finally, on the fourth day of the siege, Ampudia asked for a truce. It was granted, and he prepared to evacuate the city. Taylor demanded absolute surrender, which was made on the 24th, when General Worth's division was quartered in the city, and General Taylor, granting an armistice for eight weeks if permitted by his government, encamped with the remainder of his forces at Walnut Springs, a few miles from Monterey. In the siege of that city the Americans lost over 500 men. The Mexican loss was about double that number. See MEXICO, WAR WITH.

 

 

 

 

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