British Evacuate New York

 

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George Washington Returning to New York City on Evacuation Day

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Raising American FlagEvacuation of the City of New York. - In 1783 Washington, Governor Clinton, and Sir Guy Carleton held a conference at Dobbs Ferry, and made arrangements for the British troops to evacuate the city on November 25. On that morning the American troops under General Knox, who had come down from \Vest Point and encamped at Harlem, marched to the "Bowery Lane," and halted at the present junction of Third Avenue and the Bowery. There they remained until about 1 P.M., the British claiming the right of possession until meridian. At that hour the British had embarked at Whitehall, and before 3 PM. General Knox took formal possession of the city and of Fort George, amid the acclamations of thousands of citizens and of the roar of artillery at the Battery. Washington repaired to his quarters at Fraunce's Tavern, and there, during the afternoon, Governor Clinton gave a public dinner to the officers of the army. In the evening the town was brilliantly illuminated, rockets shot up from many private dwellings, and bonfires blazed at every corner. The British, on leaving, had nailed their flag to the staff in Fort George, and slushed the pole; but John Van Arsdale, a young sailor, soon took it down, and put the stars and stripes in its place. At sunset on that clear, frosty day the last vessel of the retiring British transports disappeared beyond the Narrows.

British Leaving New York

Last of the British Troops Leaving New York

 

 

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