President Lincoln and General McClellan

 

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THE PRESIDENT INVESTIGATES

Lincoln at McClellan's Headquarters, October 1, 1862. The serious, impassive features of the President give no hint of the thoughts that were coursing through his mind as his calm eyes gazed upon the General and his staff. He knew that "Little Mac," as the soldiers fondly termed him, was the idol of the army and had the staunch support of his officers. Lincoln also knew that he and McClellan differed radically as to the conduct of the war. Politics had crept into the Army of the Potomac, the politics which during the

campaign of 1864 opposed McClellan to Lincoln as a candidate for the presidency. As he stood there before the General's tent the Commander-in-chief could have summarily removed McClellan, but in accordance with his patient policy of leaving the future event to justify his course, Lincoln merely inspected the camp, talked with McClellan and his officers, and pondered all he saw and heard in an effort to find some military reason for the strange failure of the splendid army to end the war by a decisive campaign.

Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan

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Lincoln at Antietam

Lincoln at Antietam

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Lincoln and McClellan at Antietam

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Joseph Bailey

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Fog of War

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Robert E. Lee and his Son

Robert E. Lee and His Son

 

 

 

 

 

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