Little Round Top

 

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LITTLE ROUND TOP—THE KEY TO GETTYSBURG.

A "slaughter pen" at Gettysburg. On this rocky slope of Little Round Top, Longstreet's men fought with the Federals in the second day's conflict, July 2, 1863. From boulder to boulder they wormed their way, to find behind each a soldier waiting for the hand-to-hand struggle which meant the death of one or the other. After the battle each rock and tree overshadowed a victim. The whole tangled and terrible field presented a far more appalling appearance than does the picture, which was taken after the wounded were removed. Little Round Top had been left unprotected by the advance of General Sickles' Third Corps. This break in the Federal line was discovered by General Warren just hi time. Hastily procuring a flag, with but two or three other officers to help him he planted it on the hill, which led the Confederates to believe the position strongly occupied and delayed Longstreet's advance long enough for troops to be rushed forward to meet it. The picture tells all too plainly at what sacrifice the height was finally held.

Little Round Top

Return to Photographic Record of Civil War

[Click on Thumbnails Below for Detailed View of that Civil War Photograph]

Lincoln at Antietam

Lincoln at Antietam

Atlanta Defenses

Defense of Atlanta

Washington Defenses

Washington Defenses

New York Infantry

New York Infantry

Little Round Top

Little Round Top

Chancellorsville

Chancellorsville

Dutch Gap

Dutch Gap

Pickett's Charge

Pickett's Charge

General Reynolds' Death at Gettysburg

Lincoln and McClellan

Lincoln and McClellan at Antietam

Grant's Staff

General Grant's Staff

Joseph Bailey

Joseph Bailey

Fog of War

Fog of War

Red River Expedition

Red River Campaign

Robert E. Lee and his Son

Robert E. Lee and His Son

 

 

 

 

 

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