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FORT RICHARDSON--DRILL AT THE BIG GUNS, 1862

OFFICERS OF THE FIFTY—FIFTH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS

DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON—CAMP OF THE FIRST CONNECTICUT HEAVY ARTILLERY

Here we see some of the guardians of the city of Washington, which was threatened in the beginning of the war and subsequently on occasions when Lincoln, looking from the White House, could see in the distance the smoke from Confederate camp fires. Lincoln would not consent to the withdrawal of many of the garrisons about Washington to reinforce McClellan on the Peninsula. There was little to relieve the tedium of guard duty, and the men spent their time principally at drill and in keeping their arms and accouterments spick and span. The troops in the tents and barracks were always able to present a fine appearance on review. In sharp contrast was that of their battle-scarred comrades who passed before Lincoln when he visited the front. Foreign military attaches often visited the forts about. Washington. In the center picture we see two of them inspecting a gun.

Fort Richardson
New York Volunteers
Washington Defenses

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