Entrenchments

 

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FORMIDABLE FIELDWORKS IN AN ADVANCE

NEW NECESSITIES OF WARFARE   

The increased deadliness of firearms taught the commanders in the Civil War the habit of greatly strengthening every new position occupied with earthworks as formidable as possible. The works in the upper picture were thrown up in a night by the Federals near North Anna River, Virginia, in 1864. It is apparent how they would strengthen the resistance of a small force to larger numbers who might advance across the open upon the position. In the lower picture we see the salient of " Fort Hell," with its ditch and abattis and breastworks constructed of gabions, the result of many days' work of the soldiers in anticipation of attack. This was one of the fortifications about Petersburg, where the construction of fieldworks was developed to the highest point of efficiency.

Entrenchments
Trenches

 

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[Click on Thumbnails Below for Detailed view and information of that Photograph]

Richmond Approach

Approach to Richmond along the James River

James River

Strategic Use of the James River in the Civil War

Zeppelin

Count Zeppelin

Kings

Kings in Camp

Foreign Observers

Foreign Observers

Farrar's Island

Farrar's Island

Armstrong Run

Armstrong Run

Richmond Ruins

Richmond Ruins

Washington Defenses

Defense of Washington DC

Sherman at the Chattahoochee

Sherman's Feint at the Chattahoochee

Use of Railroads in the Civil War

City Point

City Point, Virginia

Entrenchments

Entrenchments

 

 

 


 

 

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