General Sherman's Feint at the Chattahoochee

 

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SHERMAN'S FAMOUS FEINT. RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER THE CHATTAHOOCHEE, 1863

In the foreground we see the formidable defenses behind which Johnston held the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochee against the advance of Sherman upon Atlanta. At this river Sherman exemplified again the strategy of Alexander at the Hydaspes. While Johnston with all his forces save cavalry was lying menacingly at the head of this bridge, Sherman, feinting strongly against his right with Stoneman's cavalry as if determined to gain

a crossing, meanwhile quickly shifted the main body of his army to the left of Johnston's position, crossed the river on pontoons and immediately established a tete du pont of his own in Johnston's rear capable of withstanding his entire force. There was nothing for Johnston but to retreat upon Atlanta, burning the bridge behind him. In the picture is the bridge as rebuilt by Sherman's engineers, another link in his long line of communication by rail,

Chattahoochee Bridge

 

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Sherman at the Chattahoochee

Sherman's Feint at the Chattahoochee

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