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Civil War Harper's Weekly, December 28, 1861

This WEB site contains online, readable versions of the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These old newspapers allow you to develop a unique understanding of the important events of the Civil War. This site is created to help you in your studies and your research. Check back often, as we add new material each day.

 

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Refugees

Civil War Refugees

Charleston

Burning Charleston

Trent Affair

Trent Affair

Fort Pickens

Fort Pickens Bombardment

Fire in Charleston

The Charleston Fire

Execuation of Deserter

Execution of a Deserter

Gold Pens

Gold Pens

 

Fort Pickens

Bombardment of Fort Pickens

Charleston

Charleston, South Carolina

Firing Squad

Execution by Firing Squad

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski

Winslow Homer's Great Fair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DECEMBER 28, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

831

On Christmas Eve there hung a little stocking outside Maggie's door, and it was full. The Saint must have stopped in his travels at that house—must have known what loyal, patient hearts had there the training of the little one—must have seen that Tom the younger was in these days on his good behavior.

Maggie Gwyn sat late by her fire in a prayerful meditation. Her thoughts were wandering slightly out of their wonted channels—for a moment she had dropped her anxious hope and fear; husband and country gave place to another love and name. She had turned from them, as at the most gentle call of One who turned from the Heavenly ways to ours, on such a night as this, long centuries ago. She seemed to see Him lying in the beatitude of infancy on his mother's knee, as Tom had lain on hers, and with reverent wonder she was following Him she knew so well how Mary must have followed through the years succeeding. And if her boy was fatherless she had now grace to pray that a double gift of wisdom might be given her in his behalf, that at last in fullness of time a Man might stand in his father's place, a true and loyal Man, who verily should see, if the sight were withholden from her eyes, the flag of his country flying from the old round tower. All for him she prayed, until a vision was vouchsafed her of the manhood, brave and true, that should grow from even such an infancy as his. And why should I discover altogether the young mother's dream? all the hope, whose glory was undimmed even by the dark shadows that encircled its place of rising ? How many thousand women, by silent firesides, sit dreaming the same dream of youth that must grow up fatherless, whom this year's work has bereaved! Hope of the world ! Sustainer of the fainting hearts! teach them to perfectly trust, that they may peacefully rest in Thee, and do Thy will !

While she sat there in her prayerful meditation-let me defraud you of none of the beautiful truths this hour is developing—there came, gentle as the tap, tap of the woodpecker, a touch on the window-pane. It seemed not to startle Maggie, but she looked up. Then she stood up, but stood silent. Then she moved, and not away from, but toward, the window. For she said, "There's news of Tom !" Then she opened the window, so strong was her conviction. Then her heart stopped beating—seemed to stop. How dark it was without ! But never need Maggie feel less the power of that darkness, and of the vast expanse of silence widening around her.

Neither you nor I will ever rightly know how it all came about, but presently there was a grand tableaux in the bedchamber of Tom's wife.

In the centre of the group stood a stalwart soldier in uniform, but not the uniform so hateful and so familiar of late to the old eyes of Tybee. Another sort of coat and head-gear than either he or Maggie had ever in their lives beheld represented to them a military power they were compelled to regard as friendly ; for Tom was clothed therewith. Was it a time for misgiving—doubt? They knew the eyes that looked from beneath the turban, and the hands that were grasping theirs had that in their touch that thrilled them as no other grasp could do—assured them, and lifted them up above their desolations to the very heights of Beulah.

At either side of this man stood Old Tybee and Margaret. Also, upright in bed, stood little Tom, staring hard at St. Nicholas, according to the best of his belief; and no one, for at least one instant after his uprising, saw the child. But then, when Tom the elder was aware !

At last came a moment when somebody must ask,

" Tom, where have you come from?"

Looking at the questioner, Tom answered her :

"It would take a week of steady talk to get through that report. And you and I've got other work on hand. We've got to convert the inhabitants of this island. They say the Gentiles have hoisted a beautiful kind of flag from that old tower, father. How's that ?"

There was such a stern voice speaking through these playful words as brought out from Old Tybee an instant reply that had the quality and effect of a shout.

" God in heaven be praised !"

" What for, Tybee? what for ? I should think not for such a work as that !"

"You've come to cut that cursed rag from its moorings."

" Why, no—"

Consider the appalling answer. Descend into the dreadful silence and darkness through which Maggie broke with words like these :

" Then go your ways. Let us alone !"

Tom answered her by catching up his boy, whom Maggie, for some unaccountable reason, had been busy dressing in his Christmas suit, his holiday rig.

"Follow me," he said; "and if any man attempts to tear down the Stars and Stripes shoot him on the spot!' That's my platform. Now, father, will you come ? You'll find our crew down there waiting for you. I promised 'em I'd show 'em the Governor of this island ; and he's the only man who's got the right to set that nonsense you talk about adrift. Come on, and get the flag to flying, and make ready to strike a light. Hurrah for the campaign ! Hurrah for 1862!"

A dozen miles at sea the mariner shall hail it. And often as he hails the light let him smile a benediction shoreward for the sake of Old Tybee, who, after all, has lived to see the end of the desolation he had the heart to weep for.

IMPORTANT FACTS. — Constant writing for six months is done cheaper with Gold Pens than with Steel Pens ; therefore, it is economy to use Gold Pens.

The Gold Pen remains unchanged by years of continued use, while the Steel Pen is ever changing by corrosion and wear; therefore, perfect uniformity of writing is obtained only by the use of the Gold Pen.

The Gold Pen is always ready and reliable, while the Steel Pen most be often condemned and a new one selected; therefore, there is great saving of time in the use of the Gold Pen.

Gold is capable of receiving any degree of elasticity, so that the Gold Pen is exactly adapted to the hand of the writer ; therefore, the nerves of the hand and arm are not injured, as is known to be the case by the use of Steel Pens.

See " The Pen is Mightier than the Sword," in the next column.

ADVERTISEMENTS.
Printing Offices for the People.

Prices.

Printing Office No. 2, press prints 5x 8 inches, $25.00

" " 3, "   " 7x10 " 40.00

" " 4, "   " 12x18 " 60.00

ADAMS PRESS COMPANY,

31 Park Row, New York.

The Army Drum and Fife Book.

Containing Instructions, the Reveille, Tattoo, Calls, and Beats, added to which are Infantry Bugle Calls, and Calls for Skirmishers in the United States Army. Price 75 cents. Mailed postpaid. Published by

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston.

Russian Beaver Cloaks

At Popular Prices.

United States Cloak and Mantilla Store,

304 and 306 Canal Street, N. Y.

GEO. CAREY. JEWELRY ! JEWELRY ! —The Head-Quarters for all Cash Buyers of fine and cheap Jewelry, Miniature Pins of all the Heroes. Persons wishing to see Samples, enclose stamp for full particulars. W. A. HAYWARD (Manufacturing Jeweler), 208 Broadway.

The Ordnance Manual,

For the use of the Officers of the United States Army.
1 vol. 8vo, 3d Edition. Cloth, $2.50.

D. VAN NOSTRAND, Publisher,

192 Broadway, New York.

Black Cloth Cloaks

At Popular Prices,

United States Cloak and Mantilla Store, 304 and 306 Canal Street, N. Y. GEO. CAREY.

A New Cartridge Revolver,

Carrying Six Balls (80 to the pound). Any one wanting a superior Pocket or Belt Arm will find this to be the best in the market. Price $12.00. Send for circular.

MERWIN & BRAY, Agents, 245 Broadway, N. Y., Or MERWIN & CO., 526, corner 7th and D Streets, Washington, D. C.

Vineland.—For Sale.

FARMS, of various sizes, at the new Settlement of Vineland, only 30 miles from Philadelphia. The soil is a fine clay loam, highly productive of choice fruits, grapes, peaches, wheat, grass, vegetables, tobacco, &c.

Twenty thousand acres have been divided into farms of 20 acres and upward, at the low price of from

$15 to $20 per acre.

One fourth cash, balance in four years. Also, Lots of 2 1/2 to 5 acres for fruit gardens, at from $80 to $200 each. The climate is delightful and healthful, and very beneficial to Pulmonary Complaints.

To persons of some means, or out of business, this is a good opportunity to establish a rural home in the best of markets, and be certain of a livelihood. This is the true remedy for hard times. Large numbers of people of the best character, and forming the best society, are settling.

Route to Vineland.—Leave Walnut Street wharf, Philadelphia, at 9 A.M. and 4 P.M. by railway direct. Report of Solon Robinson, of New York Tribune and Vineland Rural, can be had by applying to

CHAS. K. LANDIS, P. M., Vineland, Cumberland County, N. J. Letters answered.

"Something New for All."

GEN. GEO. B. McCLELLAN and our New Union Prize Gift Packages are to be wondered at. Seventy-five cents worth of indispensable articles for 25 cents. Agents are making from $5 to $10 per day. Agents wanted, male and female, everywhere. Address, with stamp for circular, RICKARDS & CO, 102 Nassau Street, New York.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION to all women afflicted with female weakness, or uterine disease, or irregularities, will be received by inclosing a postage stamp to JOSHUA F. BRIDGE, M.D., Resident Physician Graefenberg Company, No. 2 Bond Street, N. Y.

Cavalry Tactics;

Or, Regulations for the Instruction, Formation, and Movements of the Cavalry of the Army and Volunteers of the United States. By Philip St. Geo. Cooke, Brig-Gen. U. S. Army. 2 vols. 18mo, Cloth, $1.50.

Sent free by mail on receipt of price.

D. VAN NOSTRAND, Publisher,

192 Broadway, New York.

To Army and Navy Officers.

TIFFANY & CO., Nos. 550 and 552 Broadway, have in store, and are receiving by every steamer, SWORDS, "warranted to cut wrought iron," from Salingen; Passants, Cap Ornaments, and other Embroideries, from Paris; Gold Epaulettes and Navy Laces, &c., from London. Orders by mail promptly filled, and goods forwarded to all parts of the loyal States.

The best Books for Holiday Presents!!

Beautifully bound ENGLISH BIBLES, AMERICAN EPISCOPAL PRAYER BOOKS, CHURCH SERVICES, &c., &c., in endless variety, and suited to all tastes and purposes. SUPERB IMPERIAL 4TO BIBLES FOR WEDDING PRESENTS, at prices from $15 TO $50.

EYRE & SPOTTISWOODE,

626 Broadway, New York. (Branch of the London Establishment.)

Wanted—Commercial Agents, local and trading, of integrity and ability. None others need apply. Terms liberal—business desirable. For particulars, Address

CHASE & CO.,

Manchester, N. H.

" The PEN is Mightier
than the Sword."

THE GOLD PEN—THE BEST OF ALL PENS.
MORTON'S GOLD PENS.

The Best Pens in the World.

On receipt of any of the following sums in cash or post-stamps, the subscriber will send by return mail, or otherwise as directed, a Gold Pen or Pens, selecting the same according to description, viz.:

GOLD PENS, WITHOUT CASES.

For 25 cents, the Magic Pen; for 38 cents, the Lucky Pen ; for 50 cents, the Always-Ready Pen ; for 75 cents, the Elegant Pen ; and for $1, the Excelsior Pen. The sizes are, Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.

THE SAME PENS IN SILVER-PLATED EXTENSION
CASES, WITH PENCILS.

For 50 cents, the Magic Pen; for 75 cents, the Lucky Pen; for $1, the Always-Ready Pen; for $1.25, the Elegant Pen; and for $1.50, the Excelsior Pen. These are well-finished, good writing Gold Pens, with Iridosmin Points, the average wear of every one of which will far outlast a gross of the best Steel Pens.

The name "A. Morton," "Number," and "Quality" are stamped on the following Pens, and the Points are warranted for six months, except against accident. The numbers indicate size only: No. 1 being the smallest, No. 6 the largest, adapted for the pocket ; No. 4 the smallest, and No. 10 the largest Mammoth Gold Pen, for the desk. Long and medium Nibs of all sizes and qualities. Short Nibs of Nos. 4, 5, 6, and 7, and made only of first quality. The engravings are fac similes of the sizes and styles.

GOLD PENS, WITHOUT CASES.

For 75 cents, a No. 1 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 3 Pen, 3d quality.

For $1, a No. 2 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 3 Pen, 2d quality, or a No. 4 pen 3d quality.

For $1.25, a No. 3 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 4 Pen, 2d quality, or a No. 5 Pen, 3d quality.

For $1.50, a No. 4 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 5 Pen, 2d quality, or a No. 6 Pen, 3d quality.

For $1.75, a No. 5 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 6 Pen, 2d quality.

For $2 25 a No. 6 Pen, 1st quality.

THE SAME GOLD PENS IN SILVER EXTENSION
CASES, WITH PENCILS.

For $1.50, a No. 1 Pen, 1st quality or a No. 3 Pen, 3d quality.

For $1.75 a No. 2 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 3 Pen, 2d quality, or a No. 4 Pen, 3d quality.

For $2, a No. 3 Pen 1st quality, or a No. 4 Pen, 2d quality, or a No. 5 Pen, 3d quality.

For $2.50, a No. , Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 5 Pen, 2d quality, or a No. 6 Pen, 3d quality.

For $3, a No. 5 Pen, 1st quality, or a No. 6 Pen, 2d quality.

For $3.50 a No. 6 Pen, 1st quality.

GOLD PENS, ALL 1st QUALITY, IN SILVER-MOUNTED DESK-HOLDERS.

For $2, a No. 4 Pen ; for $2.25, a No. 5 Pen ; for $2.75, a No. 6 Pen ; for $3.50, a No. 7 Pen.

For $4, a No. S Pen; for $5, a No. 9 Pen ; and for $6, a No. 10 Pen.

The "1st Quality" are pointed with the very best Irodosmin Points, carefully selected, and none of this quality are sold with the slightest imperfection which skill and the closest scrutiny can detect.

The "2d Quality" are superior to any Pens made by him previous to the year 1860.

The "3d Quality" he intends shall equal in respect to Durability, Elasticity, and Good Writing Qualities (the only true considerations) any Gold Pens made elsewhere.

In regard to the Cheap Gold Pens, he begs leave to say that, previous to operating his New and Patented Machines, he could not have made as Good Writing and Durable Pens, for the price, had the Gold been furnished gratuitously.

Parties ordering must in all instances specify the "number" and "quality" of the Pens or Pens and Cases wanted.

For sale by all dealers in the line throughout the country.

Address   A. MORTON,

No. 25 Maiden Lane, New York. Any one sending a single letter post-stamp will receive a circular with the engravings above referred to.

A sure cure for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, and Salt Rheum. Wholesale Agents F. C. WELLS & CO., 115 Franklin St., New York. Sold by Apothecaries everywhere.

AGENTS.—Our new mammoth Price List of Watches, Jewelry, &c., is just out. It has a novel proposition for Prize Packet Dealers! Mailed free anywhere. Address HUBBARD BROS., 65 Nassau Street, N. Y.

"Matrimony made Easy."—A new work, showing how either sex may be suitably married, irrespective of age or position, prepossessing or otherwise, with a treatise on the Art of Fascinating any person you wish. A curious scientific experiment which never fails. Free for 25 cents. Address T. WILLIAM & CO., Publishers, Box 2300, Philadelphia.

French Seal Skin Cloaks
At Popular Prices.

United States Cloak and Mantilla Store, 304 and 306 Canal Street, N. Y. GEO. CAREY.

$100 PER MONTH.—Agents, MALE and FEMALE, wanted in every County in the United States. For particulars call on or address, with stamp, CHARLES M. BROWN, No. 74 Bleecker St., corner Broadway, N. Y.

Something New for Ladies.

DOWNER'S PATENT HEMMER AND SHIELD saves one-half the labor of hand-sewing, as it protects the finger from the needle, and makes a neat hem while the operator is sewing. Sample sent on receipt of the price, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS. A liberal discount to the trade. Enterprizing Agents can realize $150 per Month. Descriptive Circulars furnished on application. A. H. DOWNER, No. 442 Broadway, New York.

COOLEY'S Cabinet Printing Office for small Printers and Amateurs, the best thing out. Send fur Circulars. J. G. COOLEY & CO., 1 Spruce Street, N. Y.

The Current and Back Numbers of Harper's Weekly can be had of J. P. HUNT, Wholsale and Retail News Agent, Masonic Hall, Fifth St., Pittsburg, Pa.

Davis, Collamore & Co. Now offer their entire stock of

HOLIDAY GOODS,
Consisting of

DINING AND TEA SETS, MANTEL VASES,

GIFT CUPS,

TETE A TETE SETS,

PARIAN WARE,

BUREAU SETS, &c., &c.,

At Extraordinary Low Prices !
GLASS WARE, beautifully engraved with crest or initial, to order.
TEA TRAYS, CUTLERY, &c., &c.,
All new nice goods.

479 Broadway, New York, between Broome and Grand Streets.

CHRISTMAS ! ! !
Cloaks !      Cloaks !

For the Holidays,
at
BRODIE'S
OLD STAND,
300 Canal Street,
and
His Palace of Fashion,
Under the 5th Avenue Hotel,
Cor. of 23d Street,
New York.
The Army Officers' Pocket
Companion.

Principally designed for Staff Officers in the Field Partly translated front the French by M. de Rouvre, Lieutenant-Colonel of the French Staff Corps, with Additions from standard American, French, and English authorities. By WILLIAM P. CRAIGHILL, First Lieutenant U. S. Corps of Engineers, Assistant Professor of Engineering at the United States Military Academy.

1 vol. 18mo, full morocco, $1.50.

Sent free by mail on receipt of price.

D. VAN NOSTRAND, Publisher, 192 Broadway. N, Y.

500 Agents Wanted!

Something New ! Patent Work Holder, made of The New Gold, and 5 other curious inventions. Address (send stamp)   SHAW & CLARK, Biddeford, Maine.

The New Issue of Postage Stamps, of all denominations, for sale. Apply to HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin Square, N. Y.

FRIENDS OF SOLDIERS!

All Articles for Soldiers at Baltimore, Washington, Hilton Head, and all other places, should be sent, at half rates, by HARNDEN'S EXPRESS, No. 74 Broadway. Sutlers charged low rates.

COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS wanted. Large commission honorable business. Circular sent. A.W. Harrison, Phila

HARPER'S
NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE
For January, 1862.
CONTENTS.

THE FRANCONIAN SWITZERLAND. By BAYARD TAYLOR.

ILLUSTRATIONS. —Streitberg. — Franconian Peasant Woman.—Castle of Gossweinstein.—View in Tuchersfeld. —Rock near Rabenstein.—Where Jean Paul Wrote. Frau Rollwenzel.—Impedimenta.—The Tempest —Klinger's Grotto.—Thus Far, and no Farther.—The Haberstein.

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY. By BENSON J. LOSSING.

ILLUSTRATIONS. — The Shannon taking the Chesapeake into Hailfax.—Esek Hopkins.—Joshua Barney—Richard Dale.—Truxtun's Medal.—Edward Preble.—Naval Monument at Annapolis.—A Torpedo.—Gun-Boats.—Lynn Haven Bay.—John Rodgers.—Isaac Hull.—Jacob Jones.—A. Wasp on a Frolic.—William Bainbridge.—James Lawrence.—The Chesapeake and Shannon.—Sir Philip Broke —Lawrence's Monument.—Graves of Burrows and Blyth.—Put-in-Bay.—Isaac Chauncey.—Oliver H. Perry.—Sir James Yeo,—Cumberland Head.—Thomas Macdonough.—Downie's Grave.—Johnston Blakeley. —Stephen Decatur.—TheConstitution.—Algiers. —Decatur's Monument.

FROST.

THE ZOU-ZOU.

PENNY DEXTER.

MY BRIER-WOOD PIPE AND WHAT IT COST ME. CASTLE PICKNEY: 1861.

ORLEY FARM. By ANTHONY TROLLOPE.—Illustrated by J. E. MILLAIS.

CHAPTER XXXIII. The Angel of Light.

CHAPTER XXXIV. Mr. Furnival looks for Assistance. CHAPTER XXXV. Love was still the Lord of all. CHAPTER XXXVI. What the Young Men thought

about it.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Felix Writes.—Mary's Letter. MEHETABEL WESLEY. By J. B. HAGANY, D.D. UNDER GREEN LEAVES.

SAMUEL F. B. MORSE.

THE ADVENTURES OF PHILIP. By W. M. THACKERAY.

CHAPTER XXV. Infandi Dolores.

CHAPTER XXVI. Contains a Tug of War. ILLUSTRATIONS.— Coming to Grief. —Greek meets Greek.—Comfort in Grief.

COURTSHIP BY CHARACTER.

HINT'S FOR TRAVELERS.

MONTHLY RECORD OF CURRENT EVENTS. EDITOR'S TABLE.

EDITOR'S EASY CHAIR.

EDITOR'S FOREIGN BUREAU.

EDITOR'S DRAWER.—(With Eight Illustrations.) THE ROMANCE OF MISS SMITH'S BONNET.—(With Sixteen Illustrations.)

FASHIONS FOR JANUARY. ILLUSTRATIONS.—Evening Dress.—Walking Robe.

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year . . . . . . . $3.00

Two Copies for One Year . . . . . . 5.00
Three or more Copies for One Year (each) . 2.00
And an Extra Copy, gratis, for every Club of EIGHT
SUBSCRIBERS.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00,

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

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