Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, March 16, 1861

The March 16, 1861 edition of Harper's Weekly featured a fascinating picture and stories on the first Inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln.  We have posted the newspaper below.  Simply Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest of the newspaper.

 

The Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln

The Navy-Yard at Norfolk Virginia

Abraham Lincoln Inauguration

Abraham Lincoln First Inaugural Address

Lincoln Inaugural Cont.

Texas Forts

Texas Forts

Washington Arsenal

The Washington Arsenal

Abraham Lincoln Inaugural

Winslow Homer Illustration of Abraham Lincoln Inaugural

 

 

 

 

 

MARCH 16, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

165

THE UNITED STATES FRIGATE "SABINE," OFF FORT PICKENS. _[FROM A SKETCH BY A UNITED STATES OFFICER. ]

(Previous Page)

of those officers who have resigned United States property into the hands of the Secessionists.

THE INAUGURATION.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN was duly inaugurated at Washington on 4th March. We devote a large portion of our space in this number to the illustration of this important event. On pages 168 and 169 will be found a large view of the INAUGURATION CEREMONY; on page 161 a picture of the INAUGURAL PROCESSION and on this page an en-

graving depicting the ENTRANCE OF THE TWO PRESIDENTS INTO THE SENATE CHAMBER. The procession began to form about nine o'clock on Pennsylvania Avenue. The centre of attraction was Willard's Hotel, where Mr. Lincoln was staying, and by 10 A.M the Avenue at that point was blocked up. The day was fine and every body was in the street. Over twenty-five thousand strangers were in the city, many of whom had slept the night previous in the Capitol and in the streets—it being absolutely impossible to find rooms or beds any where.

According to custom, the Inaugural ceremonies should have begun at noon. But at that hour Mr.

Buchanan was still in his chamber at the Capitol signing bills. It was not till ten minutes past twelve that he left the Capitol. He drove rapidly to the White House, entered an open barouche with servants in livery, and proceeded to Willard's. There the President-elect, and Senators Pearce and Baker of the Committee of Arrangements, entered the carriage, and a few minutes before one the procession began to move. The order of procession was as follows

Aids.   Marshal-in-Chief.   Aids.
A National Flag with appropriate emblems. The President of the United States, with the President- Elect and Suite, with Marshals on their left, and the

Marshal of the United States for the District of Columbia (Colonel William Selden) and his Deputies on their right.
The Committee of Arrangements of the Senate.
Ex-Presidents of the United States. The Republican Association.
The Judiciary.
The Clergy.
Foreign Ministers.
The Corps Diplomatique.
Members-elect, Members and ex-Members of Congress, and ex-Members of the Cabinet.
The Peace Congress.
Heads of Bureaus.
Governors and ex-Governors of States and Territories, and Members of the Legislatures of the same. (Next Page)

PRESIDENTS BUCHANAN AND LINCOLN ENTERING THE SENATE CHAMBER BEFORE THE INAUGURATION.—.[FROM A SKETCH BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.]

Civil Warship Sabine
Abraham Lincoln and President Buchanan

 

 

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