Secretary Stanton and General Zollicoffer

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Civil War Art

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, February 8, 1862

We have posted our entire collection of Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. These newspapers are formatted so that they look just like the original page. They contain a wealth of resources to help you develop a more in depth understanding of the Civil War. We hope you find this extensive archive useful in your research and study.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Mill's Spring

Battle of Mill Spring

Battle of Somerset

Battle of Somerset

Mason and Slidell

Mason and Slidell Affair

Secretary Stanton and General Zollicoffer

Secretary Stanton and General Zollicoffer

Virginia Cavalry

Virginia Cavalry Charge

Rebel Cartoon

Rebel Cartoon

Battle of Somerset, Mill Spring, Kentucky

Battle of Somerset, Mill Spring

Bombardment of Fort Pickens

Kentucky Battle Map

Battle Map Mill Spring

Map of the Battle of Mill Spring

East River

East River Picture

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

FEBRUARY 8, 1862.

84

HON. EDWIN M. STANTON, SECRETARY OF WAR.

THE REBEL GENERAL ZOLLICOFFER, KILLED AT THE BATTLE OF SOMERSET.

HON. EDWIN M. STANTON.

EDWIN M. STANTON, now Secretary of War, whose portrait we here give, is about 45 years of age. He was born at Steubenville, Ohio, where he begun the practice of law, after having graduated at Kenyon College. He is the author of a portion of the Reports of the Supreme Court of Ohio, which bear his name. In 1848 he removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he at once took his place at the head of the bar. Early in the administration of Mr. Buchanan Mr. Stanton was selected by Attorney-General Black to represent the Government in the important land cases in California. When Mr. Cass, a little more than a year

ago, resigned his post as Secretary of State, Mr. Black, the only loyal member of the Cabinet, was appointed to the place ; and at his request the Attorney-Generalship, which he had vacated, was urged upon Mr. Stanton, who accepted it reluctantly, and at great loss to himself. In the Cabinet he soon found himself associated with Holt and Dix, and to their efforts is due the patriotic course which marked the last few weeks of Mr. Buchanan's Administration. Mr. Stanton has been through life a firm and uncompromising Democrat, and his nomination and unanimous confirmation as head of the most important Department under a President of another party is the best proof of his eminent fitness for the post. He brings to it great administrative

skill and executive firmness. His recent order in respect to the transaction of business shows that he is fully aware of the work to be done.

GENERAL ZOLLICOFFER.

FELIX K. ZOLLICOFFER, whose portrait appears on this page, was born May 19, 1812, in Maury County, Tennessee. After receiving an ordinary school education he served a few months in a printing-office, and then, at the age of seventeen, took the management of a country newspaper. His principal occupation has been that of an editor, though he held at various times offices in his own

State. He was originally a Whig in politics; and when, in 1853, all the parties in Tennessee opposed to the Democrats united under the name of the American party, Mr. Zollicoffer was elected to Congress from the Nashville district. When his State seceded he went with the majority, and was appointed a Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army, although he had no previous military experience. He was a man of considerable ability and undoubted courage ; by the rebels he was considered as one of the most promising of their officers. He fell at the battle of Somerset (or Mill Springs), fought on the 19th of January, in a vain attempt to break a link in the chain which is being wound around the rebel body in the West.

Camp.

Winona.

Niagara.

New London.

Ship Island.

9th Conn. and 22d Mass. Regiments.

Fort Massachusetts.

Wissahicon.

Sagamore.

Massachusetts.

VIEW OF SHIP ISLAND, LOUISIANA.óBY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST ON BOARD THE "SAGAMORE."

Edwin Stanton
Picture
Picture

 

 

  

Site Copyright 2003-2014 Son of the South.  For Questions or comments about this collection, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

Privacy Policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.