Execution of a Slave Trader

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, March 8, 1862

This Site features online versions of all the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. This online collection serves as a treasure trove of images and information for students and Civil War Buffs.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

Victory Poem

Victory Poem

Willie Lincoln's Death

Death of Lincoln's Son, Willie

The Slave Trade

The Slave Trade

Grant Biography

General Grant's Biography

Nashville Capitol

Nashville

Slave Trader

Execution of Slave Trader

Hand to Hand Combat

Hand to Hand Combat

Searching for Wounded

After the Battle

Nashville

Nashville, Tennessee

General Grant Cartoon

General Grant Cartoon

Rebel Flags

Rebel Flags

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MARCH 8, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

157

BRIGADIER-GENERAL CURTIS.—[FROM A PHOTOGRAPH BY ANTHONY.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL GARFIELD.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY RIDER, OF CLEVELAND, OHIO.-[SEE PAGE 151.]

GENERAL CURTIS.

WE publish herewith a portrait of BRIGADIER-GENERAL SAMUEL R. CURTIS, of Iowa, who has just defeated Price and McCulloch on the Arkansas border.

General Curtis was born February 3, 1807, in Ohio; his family were from Connecticut. He was

educated at West Point, and graduated there in 1831, entering the infantry. In 1832 he resigned his commission, studied law, and practiced for a while. In the course of a year or two he turned his attention to engineering, and became chief engineer of the Muskingum Works. At the outbreak of the Mexican War he volunteered, and accompanied General Taylor on his campaign, with the

rank of Colonel. He was for a time Governor of Monterey, and of other places occupied by our troops, and developed in this rank remarkable administrative ability. On his return home he again divided his time between law and engineering, and took an active part in the construction of the railroads which have aided so prodigiously in the development of our Western States. He settled at

Keokuk, Iowa. and was elected from thence to Congress in 1858, and again in 1860. He resigned his seat in the House to enter the army, and has for some time commanded a column in Missouri, under the orders of Gen. Halleck. He is now in chase of General Price's band of rebels, whom we learn he defeated on 19th ult. at Sugar Creek, on the Arkansas border.

EXECUTION OF GORDON THE SLAVE-TRADER, NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 21, 1862.—[SEE PAGE 150.]

General Curtis
General Garfield
Execution of Slave Trader

 

 

  

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