General Mitchell

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, April 4, 1863

This site makes all the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War available online. These old newspapers contain fascinating accounts of the important events and battles of the War. We hope you enjoy browsing this incredible collection.

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Vicksburg Canal

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Pirates

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Port Hudson Attack

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Map of Port Hudson

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Camp Wedding

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Wedding

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Scouts

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Plantation Slaves

Plantation Slaves

General Mitchell

General Mitchell

General Ross

General Ross

Beauregard Cartoon

Beauregard Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APRIL 4, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

221

BRIGADIER-GENERAL ROBERT B. MITCHELL, COMMANDING AT NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.

BRIGADIER-GENERAL LEONARD F. ROSS, COMMANDING YAZOO EXPEDITION.—[SEE NEXT PAGE.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL ROBERT
B. MITCHELL.

GENERAL ROBERT B. MITCHELL, whose portrait we give on this page, is a native of Richland County, Ohio. At the age of nineteen he went to the Mexican war, a private in the Company of the present General George W. Morgan. He served twenty-seven months and reached the rank of First Lieutenant. After his return he completed his law studies with "Miller and Morgan," in Mount Vernon. During his practice in the adjoining counties

he subsequently married a daughter of Hon. Henry St. John, of Tiffin.

In 1856 he went to Kansas. His home is Mansfield, Linn County. In 1857 and 1858 he represented the Free State party of that county in the Legislature. In 1859, Governor Medary appointed him Treasurer of the Territory. In 1860 he was appointed Adjutant-General by Governor Robinson. At the breaking out of the rebellion he volunteered as a private, raised a Company, was elected its Captain, and afterward was unanimously elected Colonel of the "Kansas Second" by its officers. He

led his regiment in the battle of Wilson's Creek, where he received four wounds, one of which proved almost fatal. His regiment here earned the title of the "Bloody Second."

As a compliment to him and his regiment, General Cameron ordered it to be mounted at a time when he was dismounting cavalry. For services at Wilson's Creek Colonel Mitchell was made a Brigadier. He was assigned to command the expedition to New Mexico, which, after the battle of Shiloh, had to be abandoned. He then embarked with a brigade from Leavenworth to reinforce General

Halleck. Much of the time that he has been with Generals Halleck, Rosecrans, and Buell he has been commanding a division. He has been in many small engagements. He took an active and distinguished part in the battle of Perryville as commander of a division. He met John Morgan with his division at Lancaster, Kentucky, and drove him out after a severe engagement.

When General Rosecrans succeeded General Buell General Mitchell was placed in command of Nashville. The post, in labor and responsibility, is almost equal to a Department. General Mitchell (Next Page)

SALE OF CONFISCATED BLOOD-HORSES AT NEW ORLEANS.—FROM A SKETCH BY MR. HAMILTON.—[SEE NEXT PAGE.]

Picture
Leonard Ross
New Orleans Horses

 

 

 

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