Civil War Torpedoes

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, February 7, 1863

This site features all the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These newspapers can yield unique insights in the war, as they were created by eye-witnesses to the events depicted. You can watch history unfold before your eyes, week by week.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

David Porter

Porter and McClernand

Wall Street

Wall Street

General Hooker

General Hooker Takes Command

Gun Boats

Gun Boats

Torpedoes

Civil War Torpedoes

Fredericksburg Poem

Battle of Fredericksburg Poem

War Atrocities

Atrocities of War

Fighting Joe Hooker

Fighting Joe Hooker

Monitor Sinking

Monitor "Weehawken" in Storm

Chivalry

Chivalry

Arkansas Post

Battle of Arkansas Post

River Torpedoes

River Torpedoes

Lavinia Warren

P. T. Barnum's "Miss Lavinia Warren

 

 

 

FEBRUARY 7, 1863.]

HARPERS WEEKLY.

85

TORPEDO IN THE WESTERN RIVERS.—SKETCHED BY A NAVAL OFFICER.—[SEE PAGE 95.]

THE NEW WESTERN GUN-
BOATS.

WE publish on page 84 portraits of three of the NEW WESTERN GUN-BOATS, which will shortly be heard from. They will form part of Commodore Porter's flotilla. The following descriptions will explain the pictures:

"INDIANOLA."

The Indianola, Lieutenant Commander George Brown, is a vessel of the following dimensions: Length, 170 feet; beam, 60 feet; depth of hold, 7

feet; and will draw when ready for action about six feet of water. She is propelled by four independent engines, two attached to the wheels and two to the propellers. She has four high-pressure boilers, and, with this great steaming power, it is expected that she will run against the current about thirteen miles per hour. She is covered with two-inch rolled plates. She has one stationary turret with sloping sides. She carries two 11-inch Dahlgren guns in the turret, and several 24-pounder guns in broadside. She has also a powerful ram; and with her great power she will no doubt prove a very destructive boat among the rebel craft.

"CHOCTAW."

The Choctaw is another vessel of the ram class, with a turret on the bow, and a few broadside guns at the stern of the vessel. She is more extensively mailed than the Indianola, but in other respects she is not far from being identical with her.

"LAFAYETTE" OR "FORT HENRY."

The Fort Henry is a ram vessel without a turret, having instead a heavy casemate forward, in which are six 11-inch guns. She has great power and speed. She was built from plans furnished by Commodore W. D. Porter, United States Navy, and was known as the Fort Henry.

STOCKADE ON THE LOUISVILLE
AND NASHVILLE RAILROAD.

ON this page we reproduce a sketch sent us by our special artist in Tennessee, Mr. Frank Beard, representing one of the numerous STOCKADES erected on the line of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad for the protection of the track. Every bridge of consequence is guarded by one of these stockades, and most of the stations likewise. Garrisoned by a few disciplined troops, these stockades can resist the attack of a very large force indeed. What a picture of grim war these stockades conjure up!

STOCKADE ON THE LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RAILROAD.—[SKETCHED BY MR. FRANK BEARD.]

Torpedoes
Louisville Nashville Railroad

 

 

 

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