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Civil War Harper's Weekly, October 24, 1863

In order to help you develop a more complete understanding of the Civil War, we have created this online archive of all the papers published during the Civil War. Reading these old papers allows you to watch the War unfold week by week. We hope you find our effort useful.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Burnside in Knoxville

Burnside Entering Knoxville, Tennessee

Draft Riot

Draft Riot Murders

British Pirates

British Pirates

Richmond Prison

Richmond's Libey Prison

Russian Cartoon

Russian Cartoon

 

 

 

Spy

Civil War Spy

Contractor

Civil War Contractors

Rapidan

Army of the Potomac on the Rapidan

Honor the Brave

Honor the Brave

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[OCTOBER 24, 1863.

684

HOW THE REBELS DESTROY RAILROADS—TWISTING THE RAILS.

horns. But Mr. Hurd's undisguised homage gratified her maternal heart, coming so soon after that great insult to her daughter; and then she said to herself, "At any rate he will help me cure her of the Wretch.'" She was not easy in her mind, though; could not tell what would come of it all. So she watched her daughter's pensive face as only mothers watch, and saw a little of the old peach bloom creeping back.

That was irresistible: she let things go their own way, and hoped for the best.

DESTROYING RAILROADS.

ONE of our artists has shown us, in the picture we publish herewith, how the rebels destroy railroads. The rails are torn from the ties, and fires are lighted and kept going under them until the iron is bent and warped so as to be useless hereafter. When a rail has been subjected to this process, there is nothing to be done with it but to send it to the foundry as "scrap iron."

RICHMOND FROM THE LIBEY
PRISON.

WE are indebted to Captain H. E. Wrigley for

the view of RICHMOND FROM THE LIBEY PRISON

which we publish herewith. Our poor fellows, shut up in the rebel dungeon, beguile the weary hours by watching and sketching the capital of Jeff Davis's empire, until every steeple and every chimney is as familiar to them as the scenes of their childhood. Let us hope it will not be long before our loyal troops get a better view of the spot, and our cannon command every house in the place.

THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

WE publish on page 685 two pictures, from sketches by Mr. A. R. Waud, illustrating the present position of the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Waud writes:

THE BLUE RIDGE.

"The back-bone of the State—the mountains of Virginia—now loom up in front of the right wing of the army, in a grand panorama of ever-changing beauty. From Stonehouse Mountain, near the tents of General Shaler and his staff, these hills are a grand spectacle. Sweeping up in many peaks, wooded to the tops, the whole range in view extends far below Madison Court House to the south, and northward beyond Front Royal. Right in front is

Turkey-hole Mountain, a rugged hill, which rises in front of Thornton's Gap; while to the south is Thoroughfare Mountain, an uneven hill. Southwest Mountain, Clark's Mountain, Cedar Run and Slaughter Mountain, and Pony Mountain, rise, isolated hills, from a wilderness of woods, with apparently few clearings. These woods are mostly of thrifty oak and other hard woods, affording quite a welcome cover to the enemy's scouts and guerrillas.

SOMERVILLE FORD.

"The rebels have now a continuous line of earth-works upon the Rapidan River, in front of our lines. In fact, there are now fortifications along the Rappahannock and Rapidan from Port Royal, twenty miles below Fredericksburg, up almost to

the sources of the latter river. Every point available for is crossing is fortified, which makes the already formidable line of the river almost impregnable. The picture of the position at Somerville Ford is a good specimen of the work done by the secessionists to stay the onward progress of this army. Along the crests of the hills are rifle-pits commanding the approaches, and behind these earth-works for guns, in position to command the opposite country. Since firing has stopped on the picket line, the sentries go clown to the banks of the river and indulge in a little talk occasionally; also in a little barter, trading coffee for tobacco, and the Harper's for the Richmond Examiner. At one of these friendly gatherings the rebel pickets wanted to know why we slid not follow their example, and fortify to prevent troops crossing. "Our soldiers could not see why they should do that, when all we desired was to have them come over and bring all their friends.'

"The rebs acknowledged, however, that they were afraid we should attempt to cross the river, and therefore did all in their power to insure safety."

Since our correspondent wrote matters seem to have changed somewhat. On the night of 9th-10th a large body of rebels moved north from Madison Court House, with what purpose can only be conjectured. On the morning of 10th General Kilpatrick had a lively cavalry skirmish with a body of Stuart's cavalry, and seems, on the whole, to have rather got the worst of it. Whether Lee is moving north with a view to fight the Army of the Potomac in its present reduced position, or whether this movement is merely a feint to cover a retreat, time will show. Lee's army has been greatly reduced of late.

1. Confederate States Capitol.—2. Castle Thunder.—3. Castle Lightning.—4. Gallego Mills.—5. Belle Isle.—6. Long Bridge, Petersburg Railroad.—7. Confederate States Steamer "Torpedo."—8. Gas-works.

VIEW OF RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, FROM THE LIBEY PRISON.—[FROM A SKETCH BY CAPTAIN HARRY E. WRIGLEY, TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS.]

Destroying Railroads
Richmond Libey Prison

 

 

 

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