Surrender of Port Hudson

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 8, 1863

Welcome to our Harper's Weekly online archive. Harper's was the most important illustrated newspaper of the day, and it featured incredible illustrations and first hand reports of the war. Reading these old papers will take you back in time, and yield a new understanding of the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Port Hudson

Port Hudson

Riots

Riots

John Morgan Captured

Capture of John Morgan

Opening of the Mississippi River

Opening of the Mississippi River

Riverboat

The Riverboat "Imperial"

Battle of Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg

Battle of Fort Wagner

Battle of Fort Wagner

Gettysburg

Gettysburg Battle Description

Capture of Port Hudson

Capture of Port Hudson

Gettysburg Battle

Gettysburg Battle

Riot Cartoon

Riot Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

VOL, VII.—No. 345.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1863.

SINGLE COPIES SIX CENTS. $3,00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1863, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


PORT HUDSON.

WE devote pages 497 and 500 this week to illustrations of the FALL OF PORT HUDSON, from sketches by our special artist, J. it. Hamilton. The following account from the Times will ex-plain the pictures:

At the earliest dawn of the—now ever memorable—9th of July, the whole camp was necessarily in the highest state of glee and commotion, and the "Star-Spangled Banner," "Yankee Doodle," and "Dixie" came borne upon the morning air—never sounding sweeter.

At 7 o'clock General Andrews, Chief of the Staff of General Banks, made his grand entrance into the rebel fortifications, with Colonel Birge leading his brave storming column, whose noble service have thus been, happily for their friends, dispensed with, but to whom the country is no less indebted—taking the will for the deed. These were followed by two picked regiments from each division, with Holcomb's and Rawle's battery of light artillery, and the gunners of the naval battery.

The rebels were drawn up in line, and an immense line they made, their officers in front of them in one side of the road, their backs to the river. Gen. Gardner then advanced toward Gen. Andrews, and, in a few accompanying words, offered to surrender his sword with Fort Hudson; but General Andrews told him, in appreciation of his bravery—how-

ever misdirected—he was at liberty to retain his sword. Our men were then drawn up in two lines on the other side of the road, opposite to the rebels, and our officers placed themselves in front of their men. Gen. Gardner then said to Gen. Andrews: "General, I will now formally surrender my command to you, and for that purpose will give the orders to ground arms."—The order was given and the arms were grounded.

After that Gen. Andrews sent fur the enemy's general officers, staff and field-officers. The line-officers were left with their companies and guard, composed of the Twenty-second Louisiana, and Seventy-fifth New York, placed over them. These formalities over, the glorious old flag of the union was unfolded to the breeze from one of the highest bluffs facing the river, by the men of the Richmond-a battery thundered forth its salute, which rolled majestic-ally up and down the broad surface of the Mississippi—and Port Hudson was ours! It was with no little de-light that I found myself riding at last over every portion of this long-forbidden ground, noting the havoc which our cannon made not only iii the ramparts but over the whole internal surface. Not a square rood but bore 'some indisputable proof of the iron deluge that had fallen upon it, in earth plowed up, trees with the bark almost completely torn off by rifle-shot, and some—twice the bulk of a man's body--fairly snapped in two by some solid ball, as easily as a walking-cane.

As to what they called the town of Port Hudson - miserable little conglom- (Next)

SALUTING THE OLD FLAG AT PORT HUDSON, JULY 9, 1863.--DRAWN BY MR. J. R. HAMILTON.

THE FORMAL SURRENDER OF PORT HUDSON.---DRAWN BY MR. J. R. HAMILTON.

Picture
Port Hudson
Surrender of Port Hudson

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $195.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


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