General Humphreys

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 16, 1864

Harper's Weekly was an illustrated newspaper published during the Civil War. The paper was distributed across the country, and was read by millions of Americans. These newspapers contained incredible illustrations and reports of the war.

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36

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

MAJOR-GENERAL ANDREW A. HUMPHREYS.

GENERAL WILLIAM W. AVERILL.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.—[SEE PAGE 34.]

GENERAL HUMPHREYS.

THIS veteran commander, whose portrait is given above, entered the Military Academy, from Pennsylvania, in 1827, graduated in 1831, and was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Artillery, but

acted for a short time as Assistant Professor of Engineering. He then served on the sea-board and in the Cherokee Country until assigned to duty with the Topographical Engineers. Afterward he served in the Florida war, and was specially mentioned for his gallantry in the engagement of June 9, 1836.

In 1838 he was again assigned to the Engineers, and in 1844 was put in charge of the Central Office of the Coast Survey at Washington. in 1848 he was appointed Captain, and in 1850 was directed to undertake surveys and investigations upon the Mississippi River and Delta, the object being to determine

the means of preventing inundations and increasing the depth of water on the bars. This work occupied nearly ten years, in the course of which he visited Europe. He had, moreover, the charge of the railroad explorations from the Mississippi to the Pacific. In 1861 he became Chief of Topographical (Next page)

THE "SUCK" IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER.—SKETCHED BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.—[SEE PAGE 38.]

January 16, 1864

Andrew Humphreys
William Averill
Tennessee River

 

 

  

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