Leland Stanford

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 23, 1864

Welcome to our online archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers. During the Civil War Harper's Weekly was the most popular newspaper in the country. Today, the papers serve as an incredible resource for students and researchers interested in learning more about the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Railroad

Railroad

Thackeray

William Thackeray

Railroad Annoyances

Negro Soldiers Liberating Slaves

Stanford

Leland Stanford

William Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray

Recruiting

Recruiting

Furlough

Furlough

Colored Troops

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JANUARY 23, 1864.

60

upon them. You have shut me out from prayer and penitence; you have been a living doom against me. Yet I am dying at last in your arms."

While he whispered, the words falling with difficulty and pain from his faltering tongue, there came to me once more a sense of ineffable peace and love brooding over us. By some subtle and finer influence the dying man shared it, and opened his eyes again to meet mine looking down upon him with that mysterious renewal of affection. All the long-known consolations, which had been to us only as a very pleasant song, or as good tidings for others from which we ourselves were shut out, entered into our souls in the hour of their extremest need. The pale evening star, steady but very far away, pointed the beginning of the immeasurable distance that was about to separate us; and from my lips, lying close to his dull ear, there fell, almost unconsciously to myself, the words that had dwelt all day in my heart, "Jesus, the Saviour of men."

I descended into the Easter streets from the fatal room, which had been the starting-point of both the murdered man and his murderer, into the boundless eternity. No one knew that I had been there; and without distinct aim or design, only hiding in my bosom the sullied and time-worn paper, I wandered back to the poor alms-house. There, with my face turned to the quiet church-yard, which offered me no refuge, though I longed for it greatly, I lay still and silent through weeks of illness, with the treasured paper in his handwriting lying under my pillow, or held for safety in my feverish hands. Afterward I remember, though vaguely, voyaging over miles of visionless waters, and finding Willie, not a heart-broken exile, but happy in a new home, and renouncing the land of his troubles and mine. But I was restless there, and must return; and returning found that the old empty house, with its death-stained attic, had been pulled down as an accursed dwelling, and not one stone of it remained upon another. Yet for me at every Eastertide it is erected again, and the tragedy of my life is acted out once more. Whatever else I forget, or whatever else my mind refuses to receive, there abides with me ever and ever the memory of my fell, remorseless purpose, and of my cruel hatred, darker in its sin than George Denning's unmeditated crime.

EX-GOVERNOR STANFORD, OF
CALIFORNIA.

WE present our readers this week with an accurate Portrait of LELAND STANFORD, President of the Central Pacific Railroad of California, and late Governor of that State. The Company of which Mr. Stanford is President was organized in 1861. In 1862 the Pacific Railroad Bill was passed by Congress; and under the provisions of this law the Company are pushing their end of the proposed road across the Sierra Nevada Mountains into the Great Basin, with the permission to continue it until it shall meet and unite with the Eastern section. We need not speak of the importance of this road, which connects the East with the gold-producing region on the coast of the Pacific, and will only say that Governor Stanford has been intimately connected with the enterprise from the first, having at an early period appreciated its value, and having devoted to it much of his time and energy.

THE STEAMER "BRAZIL" FIRED
UPON BY GUERRILLAS.

ON this page our readers will find a sketch representing an attack made upon the steamer Brazil by a band of guerrillas on the banks of the Mississippi, the 11th of last December. The scene is two miles below Rodney. Two ladies were killed in this attack, and three men wounded. The event has been one of frequent occurrence for several months, though it is hoped measures are already being taken by Government to prevent its repetition.

WILLIAM M. THACKERAY.

WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY, one of the great English novelists (whose portrait we give on page 61), was born in Calcutta, in 1811, and died in London on the 24th of December, 1863. His father was a civil officer in the service of the East India Company, and died when Thackeray was in his seventh year. The boy was soon after carried to England, (Next Page)

HON. LELAND STANFORD, PRESIDENT OF CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD.

THE STEAMER "BRAZIL," FIRED UPON BY GUERRILLAS ON THE BANKS OF THE MISSISSIPPI.

THE RUSSIAN FLEET AT THE UNITED STATES NAVY YARD, MARE ISLAND, CALIFORNIA.

Leland Stanford
steamer
Russian Fleet

 

 

  

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