Cane River

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 7, 1864

This site features our online archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers. These newspapers have impressive illustrations of the key people, events, and battles of the War. This archive will enable you to study the war in a way not possible before. Browse these papers and watch the war unfold before your eyes.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Union Scout

Union Scout

Equal Pay for Colored Troops

Pleasant Hill

Battle of Pleasant Hill

Chicago Lake Tunnel

Runaway Slave

Runaway Slave

General Gregg

Cane River

Cane River

Plymouth

Battle of Plymouth

Escaping Slaves

Stock Exchange

Battle of Pleasant Hill

Battle of Pleasant Hill

War Bonds

Advertisements

Advertisements

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[ MAY 7, 1864.

300

BRIGADIER-GENERAL DAVID M. GREGG.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.-[SEE PAGE 239.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL LORENZO THOMAS. —[PHOTOGRAPHED BY GUTEKUNST. PHILADELPHIA. ]

THE NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS
CROSSING CANE RIVER, LA.

WE give below a sketch of the NINETEENTH Army Corps, belonging to General BANKS army, crossing Cane River, Louisiana, on a pontoon bridge. The crossing took place on the 31st of March, two days having been occupied in laying the bridge. Cane River, thirty-five miles above Alexandria, is one of the more considerable streams that flow into or out of Red River, according to the relative height of the water in the two streams. Like Red River, its banks are divided at short intervals by sloughs, or bayous, as they are called by the natives, which

are sometimes magnified by rains into small rivers, and sometimes as dry as a brick sidewalk. Cane River is a fixed stream, its waters being supplied by the drainage from the higher lands on its west side. As its name implies its banks are lined with extensive " cane-brakes," which in some places cover many thousand acres, and furnish grazing for large herds of cattle. Two days after crossing the river the Federal cavalry engaged the enemy in force, and defeated them with heavy loss. All the rebel cavalry engaged were under command of General DICK TAYLOR. The entire force of the enemy amounted to about 10,000. The success at that point will give Cane River a historic importance.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL LORENZO
THOMAS.

WE present on this page a portrait of ADJUTANT-GENERAL LORENZO THOMAS, whose name has been prominently before the public during the whole of the present war. General THOMAS is a native of Delaware he entered West Point in September, 1819, and in July, 1823, was made Second Lieutenant of the Fourth Infantry. From March, 1828, to February, 1831, he acted as Adjutant, and in 1836 was made Captain. In September, 1836, he became Assistant Quarter-master, and in July, 1838, was made Assistant Adjutant-General with the rank of

Major. In September, 1846, he was made brevet Lieutenant-Colonel "for gallantry and meritorious conduct in the several conflicts at Monterey, Mexico." Subsequently, he was made Major of the Fourth Infantry, and relinquished his rank in the line. On the 15th of July, 1852, He became Assistant Adjutant-General with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. At the commencement of the war he occupied this position, but for several months past has been engaged in the West in the organization of negro regiments, and the superintendence of the work of establishing the Free Labor system on abandoned plantations. In this work he has displayed great energy and wisdom.

THE NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS CROSSING CANE RIVER, LOUISIANA.

General David Gregg
General Lorenzo Thomas
Cane River

 

 

  

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