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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 7, 1864

This site features our online archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers. These newspapers have impressive illustrations of the key people, events, and battles of the War. This archive will enable you to study the war in a way not possible before. Browse these papers and watch the war unfold before your eyes.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Union Scout

Union Scout

Equal Pay for Colored Troops

Pleasant Hill

Battle of Pleasant Hill

Chicago Lake Tunnel

Runaway Slave

Runaway Slave

General Gregg

Cane River

Cane River

Plymouth

Battle of Plymouth

Escaping Slaves

Stock Exchange

Battle of Pleasant Hill

Battle of Pleasant Hill

War Bonds

Advertisements

Advertisements

 

 

HARPER' S WEEKLY.

[MAY 7, 1864.

302

BURIED ALIVE.

MY name is Daniel Tyler, and my skin is dark, as my mother's was before me. I have heard that my father had a white face, but I think his heart and life were blacker than my mother's skin I was born a slave, and remained a slave until last April, when I found deliverance and shelter under the flag that my master was fighting to dishonor.

I shall never forget the day when freedom came to me. I was working in the fields down in Alabama, my heart full of bitterness and unutterable longings. I had dreamed for two long years of escape from my bondage ; the thought sung to me through the dark nights, and filled all the days with a weird sort of nervous expectation. But my dreams had proved nothing more than dreams ; the opportunity I yearned for did not come. But that day, working in the fields, suddenly along the dusty road there flashed a long column of loyal cavalry, the old flag flying at its head. How my heart leaped at the sight ; how, like a revelation, came the thought : "This, Daniel Tyler, is your opportunity !" Need I tell you how I acted upon that thought ; how, in one second of time, I leaped out of slavery into freedom, and from a slave became a man?

Well, joining the flashing column, I rode with them for days, coming at last into Baton Rouge, and thence, having joined a regiment of my own people, came to Memphis. Thence four hundred of us came to Fort Pillow. But there are not four hundred of us today, for three hundred and odd were murdered in cold blood only a week ago by Forrest's rough-riders.

It was a day of horrors—that 12th of March. There were seven hundred of us in all in the fort—three hundred whites of the Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and four hundred blacks, as I have said, all under command of brave Major Booth. The fort consisted simply of earth-works, on which we had mounted half a dozen guns. We knew that Forrest had been pillaging the country all about us, and imagined that perhaps he would pay us a visit; but the thought did not alarm us, though we knew, those of us who were black, that we had little to expect at the hands of the rebels. At last, about sunrise on the morning of the 12th, Forrest, with some 6000 men, appeared and at once commenced an attack. We met the assault bravely, and for two hours the fight went on briskly. Then a flag of truce came in from Forrest, asking an unconditional surrender, but Major Bradford—Major Booth having been wounded—declined to surrender unless the enemy would treat those of us who were black as prisoners of war, which, of course, they refused to do, and the fight went on. The enemy, in the next few hours, made several desperate charges, but were each time repulsed. At last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, they sent in another flag. We ceased firing out of respect to the flag ; but Forrest's men had no such notions of honor and good faith. The moment we stopped firing they swarmed all about the fort, and while the flag was yet with drawing, made a desperate charge from all sides. Up to that time only about thirty of our men had been hurt. But in this charge the enemy got with in the earth-works, and forthwith there ensued a scene which no pen can describe. Seeing that all resistance was useless, most of us threw down our arms, expecting, and many begging for, quarter. But it was in vain. Murder was in every rebel heart ; flamed in every rebel eye. Indiscriminate massacre followed instantly upon our surrender. Some of us, seeking shelter, ran to the river and tried to conceal ourselves in the bushes, but for the most part in vain. The savages, pursuing, shot down the fugitives in their tracks. There was Manuel Nichols, as brave a soldier as ever carried a musket. He had been a free negro in Michigan, but volunteered a year ago to fight for the Union. He, with others, had sought a shelter under the bank of the river, but a cold blooded monster found him, and putting a pistol close to his head, fired, failing however to kill the brave fellow. He was then hacked on the arm, and only a day after died, delirious, in the hospital. Then there was Robert Hall, another colored soldier, who was lying sick in the hospital when the massacre commenced. The devils gashed his head horribly with their sabres, and then cut off part of his right Land, which he had lifted in a mute appeal for mercy. Then there was Harrison, of the Thirteenth Tennessee, who was shot four times after surrender, and then robbed of all his effects. Before I was shot, running along the river bank, I counted fifty dead Union soldiers lying in their blood. One had crawled into a hollow log and was killed in it, another had got over the bank in the river, and on to a board that run out into the water. He laid on it on his face, with his feet in the water, and when I saw him was already stark and stiff. Several had tried to hide in crevices made by the falling bank, and could not be seen without difficulty, but they were singled out and killed. One negro corporal, Jacob Wilson, who was down on the river bank, seeing that no quarter was shown, stepped into the water so that he lay partly under it. A rebel coming along asked him what was the matter : he said he was badly wounded, and the rebel, after taking from his pocket all the money he had, left him. It happened to be near by a flatboat tied to the bank. When all was quiet Wilson crawled into it, and got three more wounded comrades also into it, and cut loose. The boat floated out into the channel and was found ashore some miles below. There were, alas, few such fortunate escapes !

I was shot near the river just about dark. Running for my life, a burly rebel struck me with his carbine, putting out one eye, and then shot me in two places. I thought he would certainly leave me with that, but I was mistaken. With half a dozen others, I was at once picked up and carried to a ditch, into which we were tossed like so many brutes. white and black together. Then they covered us with loose dirt, and left us to die. Oh, how dark and desolate it was ! Under me were several dead, and right across my breast lay a white

soldier, still alive ! How he clutched and strained! How, hurt and weak as I was, with only one hand free, I struggled for air and life, feeling my strength waning every moment ! It was a strange thing to lie there buried, and yet be able to think and pray. Maybe, friend, you have known what agony was, but you never had such pains of soul as I had down there in that living grave. I thought I could feel the worms gnawing at my flesh ; I am sure I had a taste of what death is, with the added pain of knowing that I was not dead, and yet unable to live in that dark, dismal tomb. So I clutched and strained and struggled on, digging upward as I could with my one puny hand. At last—oh joy !—a faint streak of light looked in ; my hand had carved an avenue to the world of life ! But would I dare to lift my head? Might not some rebel, standing by, strike me down again on the moment ? But I could not die there in that grave ; I must escape. Slowly, painfully, I rolled the burden from my breast—he was dead by that time—and then carefully crept out from that living death. It was dark, and no one was near. A moment I stood up on my feet ; then-

The next thing I remember I was in the hospital where I am now. They had found me just where I fell, and brought me to a place of safety, where, after a while, consciousness returned. I have been here a week now ; and I think I shall get well.

I lie in the cot where poor Robert Hall lay when he was butchered by the rebels. They showed me, yesterday, a letter he had written the day before the massacre to his wife. He had learned to read and write at Memphis, after his enlistment, and used to send a message to his wife and children, who still remained there, every week or so. This was his letter which a surgeon had helped him put together :

"DEAR MAMMY"—it ran—" I am very sick here in the hospital, but am better than I was, and hope to get well soon. They have been very kind to me ; and I find it very sweet to suffer for the dear flag that gives me shelter. You must not worry on my account. Tell Katy she must not forget to say her prayers and to study her lessons carefully now while she has an opportunity. And, mammy, take good care of the baby ; I dreamed of her last night, and I think how sad it would be to die and never see her little face again. But then chaplain says it will all be right in heaven, and he knows better than we do. And, mammy, don't forget we are free now; teach both the darlings to be worthy of their estate,"

That was poor Hall's letter—it had not been sent, and we have no heart to send it now. He will never see the baby's face here ; but then God may let him see it up yonder !

I hope to recover and get away from here very soon ; I want to be in my place again ; for I have something to avenge now, and I can not bear to wait. Poor Hall's blood is crying to me from the ground ; and I want to be able, sometime, to say to Manuel Nichols's wife, up there in Michigan. that his fall has had its compensation. And may God speed the day when this whole slaveholders' rebellion—what remains of it—shall be " Buried Alive !"

ADVERTISEMENTS.

MORTON'S GOLD PENS are now sold at the same prices as before the commencement of the war ; this is entirely owing to the Manufacturer's improvements in machinery, his present large Retail Business and Cash-in-Advance System ; for, until he commenced advertising, his business was done on Credit and strictly with the Trade.

The Morton Gold Pens are the only ones sold at old prices, as the makers of all other gold pens charge the Premium on the Gold, Government Tax, &c. ; but Morton has in no case changed his prices, Wholesale or Retail.

Of the great numbers sent by mail to all parts of the world during the past few years, not one in a thousand has failed to reach its destination in safety ; showing that the Morton Gold Pen can be obtained by any one, in every part of the world, at the same price, postage only excepted.

Reader, you can have an enduring, always ready, and reliable Gold Pen, exactly adapted to your hand and style of writing, which will do your writing vastly cheaper than Steel Pens; and at the present almost universal High Pressure Price of everything, you can have a Morton Gold Pen cheaper, in proportion to the labor spent upon it and material used, than any other Gold Pen in the World. If you want one, see "The Pen is Mightier than the Sword," in next column.

THE MOST ATTRACTIVE COLLECTION OF

Pianoforte Songs, Ballads, Duets,
Quartets, &c.

" THE SILVER CHORD."

An elegant volume of two hundred pages. Price, plain binding, $2 ; cloth, $2 25; full gilt, $3 00. Mailed, post paid. OLIVER DITSON & CO., Publishers, Boston.

Attention Company !

Clark's Onguent, a powerful stimulant. Each packet warranted to produce a full set of whiskers or moustaches in six weeks upon the smoothest face, without stain or injury to the skin. Any person using this Onguent, and finding it not as represented, by informing me of the fact, can have their money returned them at any time within 3 months from day of purchase. Price $100. Sent sealed and post paid, to any address, on receipt of the money. Address,   A. C. CLARK, P. 0. Drawer 118, Albany, N. Y.

MME. DEMOREST'S IMPERIAL DRESS ELEVATOR, a very durable, convenient, and perfect arrangement for raising the dress in graceful festoons, the fashionable style, uniformly all around, and letting it down at will. Price 50 cents. Sold at all the fancy and trimming stores, or sent by mail free on receipt of the price. No. 473 Broadway. Dealers supplied on liberal terms.

Union Playing Cards.

Colonel for King, Goddess of Liberty for Queen, and Major for Jack. 52 enameled cards to the pack. Eagles, Shields, Stars, and Flags are the suits, and you can play all the usual games. Two packs, in cases, mailed free on receipt of $1. The usual discount to the trade. Send for a Circular. Address   AMERICAN CARD COMPANY,

14 Chambers St., N. Y., or 165 William Street, N. Y.

U. S. 10-40 BONDS.

These Bonds are issued under the Act of Congress of March 6, 1864, which provides that in lieu of so much of the loan authorized by the Act of March 3, 1863, to which this is supplementary, the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to borrow from time to time, on the credit of the United States, not exceeding TWO HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS during the current fiscal year, and to prepare and issue therefor Coupon and Registered Bonds of the United States : and all Bonds issued under this Act shall be EXEMPT FROM TAXATION by or under any State or municipal authority. Subscriptions to these Bonds are received in United States notes or notes of National Banks. They are TO BE REDEEMED IN COIN at the pleasure of the Government, at any period not less than ten nor more than forty years from their date, and until their redemption FIVE PER CENT. INTEREST WILL BE PAID IN COIN, on Bonds of not over one hundred dollars annually, and on all other Bonds semi-annually.

The interest is payable on the first days of March and September in each year. The semi-annual Coupons are payable at those dates, and the annual Coupons on the 50 and 100 dollar Bonds are payable on the 1st of March.

Subscribers will receive either Registered or Coupon Bonds, as they may prefer.

Registered Bonds will be issued of the denominations of Fifty Dollars ($50), One Hundred Dollars ($100), Five Hundred Dollars ($500), One Thousand Dollars ($1000), Five Thousand Dollars ($5000), and Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000), and Coupon Bonds of the denomination of Fifty Dollars ($50), One Hundred Dollars ($100), Five Hundred Dollars ($500), and One Thousand Dollars ($1000).

Subscribers to this loan will have the option of having their Bonds draw interest from March 1, by paying the accrued interest in coin—(or in United States notes, or the notes of National Banks, adding fifty per cent. for premium), or receive them drawing interest from the date of subscription and deposit.

As these Bonds are exempt from municipal or State taxation, their value is increased from one to three per cent. per annum, according to the rate of tax levies in, various parts of the country.

At the present rate of premium on gold they pay over eight per cent. interest in currency, and are of equal convenience as a permanent or temporary investment.

It is believed that no securities offer so great inducements to lenders as the various descriptions of U. S. Bonds. In all other forms of indebtedness, the faith or ability of private parties or stock companies or separate communities only is pledged for payment, while for the debts of the United States the whole property of the country is holden to secure the payment of both principal and interest in coin.

These Bonds may be subscribed for in sums from $50 up to any magnitude, on the some terms, and are thus made equally available to the smallest lender and the largest capitalist. They can be converted into money at any moment, and the holder will have the benefit of the interest.

The fact that all duties on imports are payable in specie furnishes a fund for like payment of interest on all Government Bonds largely in excess of the wants of the treasury for this purpose.

Upon the receipt of subscriptions a certificate of deposit therefor, in duplicate, will be issued, the original of which will be forwarded by the subscriber to the Secretary of the Treasury at Washington, with a letter stating the kind [registered or coupon] and the denominations of bond required.

Upon the receipt of the original certificates at the Treasury Department, the bonds subscribed for will be transmitted to the subscribers respectively.

Subscriptions will be received by the Treasurer of the United States at Washington, and the Assistant Treasurers at New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, and by the FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK, No. 4 Wall St.

SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK, 23d St. and Broadway.

FOURTH NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK, Pine St. SIXTH NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK, 6th Avenue and Broadway.

TENTH NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK.

NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK OF NEW YORK.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ALBANY, N. Y.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF TROY, N. Y.

SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF UTICA, N. Y.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SYRACUSE, N. Y.

THIRD NATIONAL BANK OF SYRACUSE, N. Y.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BINGHAMPTON, N. Y. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BUFFALO, N. Y.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF WASHINGTON, D. C. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF PHILADELPHIA.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BALTIMORE.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NEW HAVEN, Conn. SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF NEW HAVEN, Conn. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HARTFORD, Conn.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NEW LONDON, Conn. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF STAMFORD, Cnn.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF PROVIDENCE, R. I. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, Mass.

SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, Mass.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SPRINGFIELD, Mass. SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF SPRINGFIELD, Mass. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF WORCESTER, Mass. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NEW BEDFORD, Mass. FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CLEVELAND, O.

SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF CLEVELAND, O.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CINCINNATI, O.

THIRD NATIONAL BANK OF CINCINNATI, O.

And by all National Banks which are depositories of public money. All respectable banks and bankers through out the country will furnish further information on application, and afford every facility to subscribers.

" THE PEN IS MIGHTIER THAN THE
SWORD."

THE GOLD PEN—THE BEST OF ALL PENS,
MORTON'S GOLD PENS,

THE BEST PENS IN THE WORLD.

On receipt of any of the following sums in Cash, the Subscriber will send by return mail, or otherwise, as directed, a Gold Pen or Pens—selecting the same according to description, viz.:

GOLD PENS WITHOUT CASES.

For 25 cents, the Magic Pen ; for 38 cents, the Lucky Pen ; for 50 cents, the Always-Ready Pen; for 75 cents, the Elegant Pen; and for $1, the Excelsior Pen.—These Pens are not numbered, but correspond in sizes to numbers 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 respectively.

THE SAME PENS IN SILVER-PLATED EXTENSION CASES, WITH PENCILS.

For 50 cents, the Magic Pen ; for 75 cents, the Lucky Pen ; for $1, the Always-Ready Pen ; for $1 25, the Elegant Pen ; and for $1 50, the Excelsior Pen. These are Well-Finished, Good-Writing Gold Pens, with Iridosmin Points, the average wear of every one of which will far outlast a gross of the best Steel Pens ; although they are unwarranted, and, therefore, not exchangeable.

MORTON'S WARRANTED PENS.

The name "A. Morton," "Number," and "Quality," are stamped on the following Pens, and the points are warranted for six months, except against accident. The Numbers indicate size only; No. 1 being the smallest, No. 6 the largest, adapted for the pocket; No. 4 the smallest, and No. 10 the largest Mammoth Gold Pen, for the desk. Long and Medium Nibs of all sizes and qualities. Short Nibs of Numbers 4, 5, 6, and 7, and made only of first quality. The Long and Short Nibs are fine pointed; the Medium Nibs are Broad, Coarse Business points. The engravings are fac-similes of the sizes and styles.

GOLD PENS, WITHOUT CASES.

For $0 75 a No. 1 Pen, 1st quality; or a No. 3 Pen, 3d quality. For $1 00 a No. 2 Pen, 1st quality ; or a No. 3 Pen, 2d quality; or a No. 4 Pen, 3d quality.    For $1 25, a No. 3 Pen, 1st quality; or a No. 4 Pen, 2d quality; or a No. 5 Pen, 3d quality. For $1 50, a No. 4 Pen, 1st quality; or a No. 5 Pen, 2d quality ; or a No. 6 Pen, 3d quality. For $1 75, a No. 5 Pen, 1st quality; or a No. 6 Pen, 2d quality. For $2 25, a No. 6 Pen; $2 75 a No. 7 Pen; $3 25 a No. 8 Pen ; $4 a No. 9 Pen ; $5 No. 10 Pen—all 1st quality. THE SAME GOLD PENS, IN SILVER EXTENSION

CASES, WITH PENCILS.

For $1 50 a No. 1 Pen, 1st quality; or a No 3 Pen, 3d quality.

For $1 75, a No. 2 Pen, 1st quality; or a No. 3 Pen, 2d quality ; or a No. 4 Pen, 3d quality.

For $2 00, a No. 3 Pen, 1st quality ; or a No. 4 Pen, 2d quality ; or a No. 5 Pen, 3d quality.

For $2 50 a No. 4 Pen, 1st quality ; or a No. 5 Pen, 2d quality ; or a No. 6 Pen, 3d quality.

For $3 00, a No. 5 Pen, 1st quality; or a No. 6 Pen, 2d quality. For $3 50, a No. 6 Pen, 1st quality.

GOLD PENS, ALL FIRST QUALITY, IN SILVER MOUNTED DESK HOLDERS. For $2 00 a No. 4 Pen; for $2 25 a No. 5 Pen; for $2 75 a No. 6 Pen; for $3 50 a No. 7 Pen. For $4 09 a No. 8 Pen; for $5 a No. 9 Pen; and for $6 a No. 10 Pen.

The "1st Quality" are pointed with the very best lridosmin Points, carefully selected, and none of this quality are sold with the slightest imperfection which skill and the closest scrutiny can detect. The " 2d Quality" are superior to any Pens made by him previous to the year 1860. " The 3d Quality" he intends shall equal in respect to Durability, Elasticity and Good Writing Qualities (the only true considerations) any Gold Pens made elsewhere. In regard to the Cheap Gold Pens, he begs leave to say that, previous to operating his New and Patented Machines, he could not have made as Good Writing and Durable Pens, for the price, had the Gold been furnished gratuitously. Parties ordering must in all instances specify the "Name" or the " Number" and " Quality" of the Pens wanted, and be particular to describe the kind they prefer—whether stiff or limber, coarse or fine. All remittances sent by mail in registered letters are at my risk: and to all who send twenty cents (the charge for registering), in addition to the price of goods ordered, I will guaranty their safe delivery. Parties sending Gold or Silver will be allowed the full premium on the day received.

TO CLUBS.—A discount of 10 per cent. will be allowed on sums of $12, of 15 per cent. on $24, and of 20 per cent. on $40, if sent to one address at one time. Address,   A. MORTON, No. 25 Maiden Lane, New York.

The Graefenberg Company's UTERINE CATHOLICON (Marshall's). An infallible cure for "Female Weakness," and all Uterine complaints of women. Price $1 50 per bottle. Five bottles for Six DOLLARS. THE GRAEFENBERG VEGETABLE PILLS. The best Pill in the world for family use, and for all Bilious and Liver complaints. Price 25 cents per box. Address all orders to   J. F. BRIDGE, M.D., Resident Physician GRAEFENBERG COMPANY, No. 139 William Street, near Fulton, New York.

INQUIRE OF DEALERS EVERYWHERE.

Do they Pray for Me at Home? The best song out. Mailed for 25 cents. O. DITSON & CO., Boston, Mass.

Baker's Rheumatic Balm. This remedy has been used in the fancily of the proprietor and his friends for many years, and they have induced him to offer it for sale to the public, feeling confident, after a trial, that they will consider him a public benefactor. In cases of Chronic and Inflammatory Rheumatism it is invaluable; and if, after a fair trial, it fails to cure, the money will be returned. Price $1 per bottle.

PRINCIPAL DEPOT: No. 154 Tenth Street, near Fourth Avenue. Sold by the principal Druggists. Remedies sent to any address on receipt of price. Two Dollars made from twenty cts. Call and examine, or ten samples sent free by mail for 20c. Retails for $2, by R. L. WOLCOTT, 170 Chatham Square, N. Y.

EXTRAORDINARY NOVELTIES continually appearing in DEMOREST'S NEW YORK ILLUSTRATED NEWS. Do not fail to see this week's number, now ready, universally acknowledged the most spicy and fine weekly now published.

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