The Battle of Mobile Alabama

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 27, 1865

The May 27, 1865 edition of Harper's Weekly features a cover article on Lewis Payne, the would-be assassin of Secretary Seward, news of the capture of Jefferson Davis, and important information of Black Suffrage following the Civil War.  We have posted the entire newspaper in readable form.  Simply click on the thumbnail below to be taken to a large, readable version of that page.

Capture of Jefferson Davis

Capture of Jefferson Davis

Black Suffrage

Black Suffrage

Jefferson Davis Accused of Treason

Jefferson Davis Accused of Treason

Abraham Lincoln Chicago Funeral

Abraham Lincoln Chicago Funeral

General Johnston's Surrender

General Joseph Johnston's Surrender

Joe Johnston Surrender

Johnston's Surrender to Sherman

Battle of Fort Mahone

Battle of Fort Mahone

Battle for Mobile

Battle For Mobile Alabama

Abraham Lincoln's Tomb

Abraham Lincoln's Tomb

 

 

THE FIGHT BEFORE MOBILE—STORMING OF FORT BLAKELY, APRIL. 9, 1865.

THE FIGHT BEFORE MOBILE.

WE have already, in a previous number, described the assault on Fort Blakely, which we illustrate this week on this page. Probably the last charge of this war, it was as gallant as any on record. Fort

men. They carried the work, and this brave and successful assault finished the fight before Mobile.

Several batteries of artillery and large quantities of ammunition were taken with the fort, besides 2400 prisoners. Our. loss in the whole affair was about 2000 killed and wounded.

THE " BLACK HAWK."

WE engrave on this page an illustration of the burning of the Black Hawk, the flag-ship of the Mississippi squadron, off Mount City, April 22. The fire broke out below where paints and oils were

stored. It was found impossible to subdue the flames, and the boat was entirely consumed. Only four lives were lost. The magazine, containing 500 pounds of powder, exploded about an hour after the fire broke out. The officers and crew of the black Hawk numbered somewhat over three hundred.

The boat was commanded by Captain CHARLES A. BABCOCK. The fire is supposed to have been originated by the negligence of a painter, who went be-low for oil or turpentine, and carelessly set a light, ed lamp where it quickly ignited the combustible material around it.

BURNING OF THE "BLACK HAWK," APRIL. 22, 1865.-[SKETCHED BY ADAM ROHE.]

THE GUN-BOAT "GENESEE" PROVIDED WITH A NET-WORK AGAINST TORPEDOES.—[SKETCHED BY GEORGE WATTERS.]

Blakely formed the left of the rebel line of works defending Mobile. The approach to the work was impeded by obstructions of every sort, which the national troops were fully one hour in making their w a y through. The loss here was great ; but no obstacle hindered, no degree of carnage daunted the

The Battle of Mobile Alabama
The ship Blackhawk
The Gun Boat Genesee
Picture

 

 

  

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