Scene of General Johnston's Surrender

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 27, 1865

The May 27, 1865 edition of Harper's Weekly features a cover article on Lewis Payne, the would-be assassin of Secretary Seward, news of the capture of Jefferson Davis, and important information of Black Suffrage following the Civil War.  We have posted the entire newspaper in readable form.  Simply click on the thumbnail below to be taken to a large, readable version of that page.

Capture of Jefferson Davis

Capture of Jefferson Davis

Black Suffrage

Black Suffrage

Jefferson Davis Accused of Treason

Jefferson Davis Accused of Treason

Abraham Lincoln Chicago Funeral

Abraham Lincoln Chicago Funeral

General Johnston's Surrender

General Joseph Johnston's Surrender

Joe Johnston Surrender

Johnston's Surrender to Sherman

Battle of Fort Mahone

Battle of Fort Mahone

Battle for Mobile

Battle For Mobile Alabama

Abraham Lincoln's Tomb

Abraham Lincoln's Tomb

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[MAY 27, 1865.

332

REBEL SMALL: ARMS TURNED OVER BY JOHNSTON'S ARMY TO LIEUTENANT LYSTER, CHIEF OF  ORDNANCE, DEPARTMENT NORTH CAROLINA, GEEENSBOROUGH, MAY 3, 1865.

the wind. For a moment on the green bank, and then the pebbled beach, and then a jutting rock, I saw the fluttering of drapery, the outline of an impassioned form, the last dim waving of the hand. A mist was in my eyes. I had taken the last look of her forever.

I have lived fifteen feverish years since then. The advantages lost to impoverished boyhood were to be made good in manhood. I know not what others might have done ; but it took me seven years to gain an education, and then the work was but half done. The battle-field, the prison, the bivouac, the march—I know them all, but never did they require the fortitude of that fierce struggle, that forlorn hope against poverty and misfortune. Cherished objects eluded me. Disappointment followed disappointment until I lost faith in myself. I thought that fate was against me. Perhaps I ought to blush to say so, but I did despair. Then I saw again with misty eyes a white hand in the distance. And lost, still not lost, it is waving to me yet, as I drift each moment farther out on the years widening between. At length I dared wait no longer. Ten years of faithful work had left their marks upon my face, but I thought I saw my way clear in the world. I would no longer fear the future. I could support such a wife as Maggie would be. I would go back to the old town and marry her.

When I returned she was traveling in the South. Although she had not written any intention of leaving home, and I had expected to meet her there, yet a longer time than usual had elapsed since my last writing. She had not expected my coming, and at first there appeared nothing remarkable in her absence. She would be home in a few weeks.

ACCOUTREMENTS OF JOHNSTON'S ARMY TURNED OVER TO J. S. CLINGMAN, ORDNANCE OFFICE,  DEPARTMENT NORTH CAROLINA, MAY 3, 1865.--[SKETCHED By DAVIS.]

I visited the country place which I had left ten years before. I walked again in the woods, and by the river, and in the paths where our feet had walked together so many, many days ago. I passed through the gate where I had kissed her the first time we ever knew what sad things partings are. The moss was deeper on the rocks ; some trees had grow n, and others had decayed; many of the country people whom I expected would meet me with outstretched hands had passed into the grave-yard, or had forgotten me, or eyed me as if I was no longer their friend. Next to parting from a place we love the saddest thing is to return again.

Chinny. who was now called Mr. Charles Hub-bell, had completed sowing his wild oats, and succeeded to his father's business. He still lived with his father, and my head-quarters, when in town, were at his rooms. Ah, what pleasant hours we spent together, talking over old times! He kept unsoured the same generous heart that had made me his devoted friend in boyhood, and the old spice of deviltry within him was not quite subdued. But Chinny was a man.

I was soon impressed that there was something strange connected with Maggie's departure, something unexpected even to her parents, something which they desired me to know, and yet forbore to tell. A letter was received from Miss Hubbell the elder, who had accompanied Maggie, but none from Maggie herself. A deeper shade passed over the faces of the Hubbells. .But a few words were read aloud, yet I saw the letter brought unwelcome news. She could not be married, and on a bridal tour? No. The last lines I had received from her were the fondest she had ever written. She could not be

INTERIOR OF JAMES BENNETT'S HOUSE—SCENE OF JOHNSTON'S SURRENDER. APRIL 26, 1865.  [SKETCHED BY DAVIS.]

JAMES BENNETT'S HOUSE, WHERE JOHNSTON SURRENDERED TO SHERMAN--EXTERIOR VIEW.—[SKETCHED BY DAVIS]

Johnston's Pistols
Johnston's Arms
Scene of Johnston's Surrender
House Where Johnston Surrendered to Sherman

 

 

  

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