Surrender of Fort Fisher

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Revolutionary War

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, February 4, 1865

This site features an online archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These old newspapers make fascinating reading, and present first reports of the battles and key events. The woodcut illustrations were created by eye-witnesses to the events and shed new light on this important conflict. This material is simply not available anywhere else.

 (Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Fort Fisher

Battle of Fort Fisher

Sherman March

Editorial on General Sherman's March

Pardon

Pardon of Mrs. Hutchins

Surrender of Fort Fisher

Surrender of Fort Fisher

Soldier's Diary

Soldier's Diary

General Ames

General Adelbert Ames

Destruction of the Savannah Ram

Transatlantic Telegraph

Transatlantic Telegraph

Celebration

Soldiers Celebrating

Battle of Fort Fisher

Battle of Fort Fisher

John Bull Cartoon

John Bull Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

FEBRUARY 4, 1865.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

69

THE LATE LIEUTENANT SAMUEL W. PRESTON.[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

THE LATE LIEUTENANT BENJAMIN H. PORTER.[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

LIEUTENANT S. W. PRESTON.

LIEUTENANT SAMUEL W. PRESTON, killed in the attack on Fort Fisher, while acting as Flag-Lieutenant of the fleet of Admiral PORTER, was a native of Canada, but at an early age removed to Illinois, from which State he was appointed to the navy in 1858. He served as midshipman and ensign until August, 1862, when he was promoted Lieutenant. When Admiral DAHLGREN attacked Charleston for the first time with the fleet he was Flag-Lieutenant of the Wabash, and afterward he commanded the Ironsides. He also acted on DAHLGREN'S staff in the attack which was subsequently made on Fort

Sumter. He was taken prisoner here and sent to Columbia, South Carolina, where he was imprisoned for fourteen months. Upon his exchange he was assigned to duty in the North Atlantic squadron. He was a young officer only 23 years old, and he fell leading a company of the Naval Brigade in the assault on Fort Fisher.

LIEUTENANT B. H. PORTER.

LIEUTENANT B. H. PORTER, killed in the assault on Fort Fisher, was born in New York in 1845, and entered the navy at the age of fourteen. In the

Burnside Expedition he was midshipman in the frigate Roanoke; and during the battle of Roanoke Island he commanded the launch of six Dahlgren howitzers in the advance of the centre. He maintained his position under a galling fire until most of his men had fallen, when one of his guns exploded and only one man remained with him, At last this solitary gunner, a young man of seventeen, fell, and PORTER remained alone, cleaning, loading, and firing his guns himself until the day was won. He was promoted November 8, 1862. Afterward he was captured by the enemy, who kept him a prisoner during the greater part of a year. He had only been released a short time when he was as-

signed to PORTER'S squadron. He commanded the flag-ship Malvern, but was killed while leading a company in the assault on Fort Fisher.

LOVE AND FATE.

IT was my last evening of a month I had been spending with my friend Frank Blundell. We had met, after an interval of some years, in his country home. My friend had married since I last saw him, and his wife was a stranger to me until this visit. I found her one of the few wives who practically recommend marriage to their husbands' unmarried

ADMIRAL PORTERS FLEET CELEBRATING THE SURRENDER OF FORT FISHER.

Samuel Preston
Benjamin Porter
Surrender Fort Fisher

 

 

  

Site Copyright 2003-2014 Son of the South.  For Questions or comments about this collection, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

Privacy Policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.