The Union Army at Cairo Illinois

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, June 29, 1861

This original Civil War Harper's Weekly newspaper features a cover illustration showing the important role women played in the War Effort. It also has a article on the Battle of Great Bethel, and a number of fascinating illustrations.

(Scroll Down to See full page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest)

 

Women Volunteers Civil War

Women Volunteers

Civil War Piracy

Evacuation of Harper's Ferry

Martinsburg

Martinsburg, Virginia

Whipping Post

Slave Whipping Post

Vermont Regiment

Vermont Regiment

Camp Slifer

Camp Slifer

Battle of Great Bethel

The Battle of Great Bethel

Duryee's Zouaves

Colonel Duryee's Zouaves at Great Bethel

The Army at Cairo

The Union Army at Cairo, Illinois

Riverboats

Riverboats at Cairo, Illinois

The Army of the Potomac

The Army of the Potomac

The Privateer Savannah

The Privateer Savannah

Negro Cartoon

 
 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JUNE 29, 1861.

410

MOAT AND SEAWARD FACE OF FORTRESS MONROE.-PHOTOGRAPHED BY STACY.[SEE PAGE 413.]

OUR ARMY AT CAIRO.

WE continue our series of engravings of our army at Cairo with three illustrations on page 411; to wit, two of the BATTERIES ON THE OHIO LEVEE, and a third representing the LANDING OF THE FOURTH AND TWELFTH REGIMENTS ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS AT CAIRO. All three are from sketches by our correspondent, Mr. Alexander Simplot.

The batteries speak for themselves, and need no explanation. The Fourth, Colonel Cook, and the Twelfth, Colonel M'Arthur, were conveyed to Cairo in the City of Alton and Louisiana steamers,

and made a very fine appearance. Our correspondent writes us as follows about the camp Cairo, under date of June 9 :

There are now about 8000 men in and about Cairo and Bird's Point. Some 3000 are in barracks at the Point, which has been named Camp Defiance, and latterly have been busily employed in removing obstructions and erecting substantial fortifications. All their heavy cannons are now mounted and apparently ready for mischief. Directly above them, near the Mississippi levee, the Seventh and Twelfth regiments are encamped, and still above them is Camp Barker, an encampment of cavalry, Camp Houghtling, and Camp Smith, light artillery. The last three have romantic locations, being fairly embowered in trees, rendered musical by the deliciously-tuned voices of birds

and myriads of mosquitoes. Above the city, on the Ohio levee, is an encampment-of light artillery under Captain M'Allister. A company of light artillery from Chicago, under command of Captain Taylor, are quartered at the Illinois Central Railroad Freight Depot. They brought down with them quite a number of cannon, which are now displaying their teeth from the river front of the building. At various points on the Illinois Central Railroad there are several regiments encamped, and so easy of access that, should circumstances require, the farthest could be brought to this point in a day. The programme set forth a few days since, that an army of 80,000 would be concentrated here, seems apparently about to be realized. Within the last week between 3000 and 4000 men have arrived here, and several thousand, I understand, are expected this coming week.

How General Prentiss manages traitors the following anecdote will tell:

A company belonging to General Prentiss's command captured part of an organized band of rebels, and brought them into camp. General Prentiss asked them if they would take the oath, when three consented to do so, and seventeen refused. The General then rose in the presence of the whole party, and addressed them as follows:

"Go hone," said he to the three loyal ones, " raise tomorrow morning the flag of the Union, of your country; load up your weapons and shoot the first man that tries to pull it down. As for these traitors they will be set tomorrow to work wheeling dirt, and shall be kept at it until I get the balance of the witnesses; then I shall send them to St. Louis to be tried for treason."

LANDING OF THE SCOTT LIFE-GUARD AT NEWPORT NEWS, AT 7 A.M. ON JUNE 7.-SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.[SEE PAGE 413.]

Fort Monroe Moat
Newport News

 

 

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