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Civil War Harper's Weekly, June 29, 1861

This original Civil War Harper's Weekly newspaper features a cover illustration showing the important role women played in the War Effort. It also has a  article on the Battle of Great Bethel, and a number of fascinating illustrations.

(Scroll Down to See full page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest)

 

Women Volunteers Civil War

Women Volunteers

Civil War Piracy

Evacuation of Harper's Ferry

Martinsburg

Martinsburg, Virginia

Whipping Post

Slave Whipping Post

Vermont Regiment

Vermont Regiment

Camp Slifer

Camp Slifer

Battle of Great Bethel

The Battle of Great Bethel

Duryee's Zouaves

Colonel Duryee's Zouaves at Great Bethel

The Army at Cairo

The Union Army at Cairo, Illinois

Riverboats

Riverboats at Cairo, Illinois

The Army of the Potomac

The Army of the Potomac

The Privateer Savannah

The Privateer Savannah

Negro Cartoon

 
 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JUNE 29, 1861.

406

WHIPPING-POST ON THE PREMISES OF MR. WEST, AT NEWPORT NEWS, VA. SKETCHED BY OUR, SPECIAL ARTIST.-[SEE PAGE 413.]

OUR ARMY LEAVING CHAMBERSBURG.

WE have received from our Special Artist attached to the staff of General Williams the sketches which are published on page 404. They represent CAMP SLIFER, near Chambersburg, where most of General Patterson's army was assembled before the march; and the DEPARTURE OF THE FIRST BRIGADE (Colonel Thomas, U.S.A., Commanding) of General Patterson's army from Chambersburg on 7th inst. The Chambersburg Repository of 8th thus describes their departure :

Yesterday morning about eight o'clock a considerable number of the soldiers who were quartered here took up

the line of march for the South. The following, as well as we could ascertain, were those who left :

Four companies of Cavalry, regulars, well mounted, and the first City Troop of Horse, of Philadelphia; two companies of artillery, acting as infantry, and two companies of regular infantry—the four last named under Captain Doubleday, of Fort Sumter; the 6th Regiment, Colonel Nagle; the 21st Regiment, Col. Ballier; the 23d Regiment, Colonel Dare; and Captain McMullin's Independent Rangers the whole forming the first brigade, and are commanded by Colonel Thomas, of the regular army.

Their appearance was excellent ; their marching of the best order; and their carriage such as to assure all who witnessed their movements- and they were thousands, for every available spot was occupied by our people — that they were perfectly able to endure the fatigues of a long march. This brigade,

 being the first, will lead off in the contest that is shortly to take place, and their movements are watched by an eager community with deep interest.

REBEL ARMY AT HARPER'S FERRY.

AN enterprising correspondent has sent us sketches from which we have prepared the illustrations on page 405, representing the LEESBURG BRIDGE ACROSS THE POTOMAC, and the ARRIVAL OF TROOPS AT MARTINSBURG, VIRGINIA.

Leesburg Bridge crosses the Potomac River 13 miles below Harper's Ferry, connecting Maryland with Loudon County, Virginia, and is distant about 20 miles from the town of Leesburg. The river at this point is a quarter of a mile wide, and flows over a very rocky bed. The high land seen on the Virginia side is Bull Run Mountain, from the top of which a splendid view of the surrounding country is obtained. This position is at present held by about 2000 Secession troops, encamped on the Virginia side, with strong pickets thrown out for some distance along the Maryland shore.

A description of Martinsburg is hardly necessary. It is one of the principal stations on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 100 miles from Baltimore and 19 miles beyond Harper's Ferry. Our correspondent says he doesn't know how many troops are stationed there now ; the greater portion of them were sent down to Harper's Ferry some days ago. This view was taken from opposite the Railroad Hotel, where the cars stop, looking east toward Baltimore.

THE PRIVATEER "SAVANNAH."

WE publish on page 413 a picture of the Savannah, a Charleston privateer, taken into the port of New York last week, under charge of a prize crew from the United States brig Perry. The following account of her cruise and capture was given by one of the officers of the Perry:

The Savannah was fitted out as a privateer in Charleston. She was provided with a crew of twenty men. Two or three days previous to their falling into the hands of the Federal Government, the Joseph, of Rockland, loaded with sugar from Cardenas, Cuba, was fallen in with and captured. The captain of the Joseph was taken on board the privateer, and received the worst treatment. He was refused any of his property, and then stripped almost naked of the apparel which he had on. The privateer put eight men of her crew on board the prize, and transferred the crew of the Joseph to her own deck. The Savannah then left the prize vessel, giving orders to those on board to put into the nearest port belonging to the Confederate States.

The Joseph soon after succeeded in reaching Georgetown, South Carolina. The Savannah accompanied them almost to Georgetown. After the privateer saw her prize safely ensconced in Georgetown, she put out in quest of some further material to practice upon in the way of merchant vessels, and happened to perceive the brig Perry in the distance, which she mistook for a merchantman, as she had her ports closed in order to deceive the advancing enemy. The Savannah pushed boldly forward to the attack, thinking that she had an easy prey, but when almost within shot distance she discovered that she had got into the clutches of one of Uncle Sam's emissaries, and immediately the order was given "bout ship," and the "bold privateer" showed the white feather, and tried to run. The Perry clapped on all sail, and gave hot pursuit. The chase was quite exciting. When the vessels came within range of each other's guns, a simultaneous fire was opened by both crafts, but no person was injured on either side. The shots of the Savannah had no effect whatever, they flying far athwart the bows of the ship, and taking every imaginable course but the right one, while on the contrary the attack of the United States vessel produced some havoc in the rigging of the enemy, two shots passing completely through her foresail and cutting away some of her ropes.

The Savannah at last hove to, seeing no possible chance of escape, and was immediately boarded by the crew of the Perry. The naval officers at once rushed down into the cabin, and secured the papers, etc. No resistance was (Next Page)

JOHN TYLER'S RESIDENCE, HAMPTON, VIRGINIA.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY STACY,-[SEE PAGE 413.]

GUN-YARD UNDER THE WALLS OF FORTRESS MONROE.-PHOTOGRAPHED BY STACY.—[SEE PAGE 413.]

CHESAPEAKE FEMALE COLLEGE—HEAD-QUARTERS OF GEN. PIERCE.—PHOT. BY STAGY.-[SEE PAGE 413.]

SHOT AND SHELL PILED UNDER THE WALLS OF FORTRESS MONROE.—PHOT. BY STACY,—[SEE P. 413.]

THE ONLY ENTRANCE TO FORTRESS MONROE.—[SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST].—[SEE PAGE 413.]

Slave Whipping Post
John Tyler's House
Fort Monroe Gun Yard
Chesapeke Female College
Fort Monroe Cannon Balls
Fort Monroe Entrance

 

 

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