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Civil War Harper's Weekly, June 15, 1861

This issue of Harper's Weekly has a variety of interesting stories and pictures. The cover has an illustration and story on the death of Colonel Ellsworth. The issue also has a discussion on the problem of fugitive slaves. News describes early events in the Civil War.

(Scroll Down to See entire page, Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest)

 

Ellsworth's Death

Colonel Ellsworth's Death

Revolution

The Right of Revolution

The Fugitive Slave Question

The Fugitive Slave Question

Rebel Cavalry

Capture of Rebel Cavalry

General Bragg's Camp

General Bragg's Camp

Camp Anderson

Camp Anderson

Santa Rosa Island

Santa Rosa Island

Las Moras

Confederate Troops on the Las Moras

Civil War Camps

Civil War Camps

Rebel Steamboats

Rebel Steamboats

Arlington heights

Arlington Heights

Senator Douglas

Senator Douglas

Newport News

Newport News

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JUNE 15, 1861.

378

ADVANCE OF THE FEDERAL TROOPS (MICHIGAN REGIMENT AND SHERMAN'S BATTERY) INTO ALEXANDRIA, MAY 24.-[SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.]

CAMP ANDERSON.

A CORRESPONDENT has sent us a sketch of CAMP ANDERSON, the original encampment of the Twelfth Regiment N. Y. S. M., at Washington, and we herewith reproduce it, in order that our friends who have relatives in the Regiment may see how they are situated.

OCCUPATION OF ALEXANDRIA.

WE publish on this page an engraving of the OCCUPATION OF ALEXANDRIA by the Michigan

Regiment, and Sherman's Battery of Artillery. The latter is the splendid battery which was the first to turn out on the occasion of the recent alarm at Washington. Mr. George Wilkes saw them pass up the Avenue, and thus described the scene in a letter to the Tribune :

Cheers rose from the crowds as the dragoons went by ; but before those cheers were done a vast rumbling was heard in the same direction which the dragoons had come from, and in the next instant Sherman's. famous battery, with six horses to each gun, were seen tearing around into the Avenue at fearful speed, the troopers and cannoneers screaming wildly, like so many madmen, as they went. Their rate of progress was so swift that in turning the Fourteenth Street corner the whirl of the gun-carriage spun off a left-hand wheel, and dashed the vehicle against

an iron post, flinging the men off the caissons, and knocking down two of the horses. But the remaining horses were whipped on, dragging the fallen animals on their sides along the road, and the naked axle doing duty for the missing wheel. They passed shouting out of sight, and the accelerating huzzas of the equally crazy multitude went after them as long as their wheels and voices could be heard.

FORT WAYNE, MICHIGAN.

WE publish on next page a view of FORT WAYNE, ON THE DETROIT RIVER, MICHIGAN, now in possession of the Michigan Volunteers. The following description is from the Detroit Advertiser :

Fort-Wayne was commenced under the supervision of Captain Meigs about 1840, and brought to its present state in 1850. Thus far it has cost the Government $175,000, and the finishing it will probably involve an expense of at least $50,000 more. The timber used in its construction is red cedar and kyanized oak. It is an earth-work, and square shaped, with bastion corners, surrounded by a ditch. On the water side is an out-work separated from the main by a trench ; this out-work will contain fifteen guns. The main work is reached from the out-work by an underground passage, which is guarded at each end by heavy iron doors. The entire work will mount forty-seven heavy guns and sixteen light pieces for sweeping the ditch; of these latter there are four on each bastion. On the east side is the main entrance to the fort, which is another tunnel also guarded with iron doors. One Michigan regiment is now in Alexandria.

CAMP ANDERSON, HEAD-QUARTERS OF THE NEW YORK TWELFTH REGIMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C.

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