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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 2, 1861

This site features readable versions of the original issues of Harper's Weekly newspapers from 1861-1865. You can browse these newspapers by topic, or search on a specific topic using the search box on the bottom of this page. We hope you enjoy reading these old newspapers, and gaining perspective on the important people and places of the Civil War.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

The Merrimac

The Merrimac

Closing the Potomac

Rebels Close Potomac

Bolivar

Battle of Bolivar

Artillery

Geary's Artillery

Army of the Potomac

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Food

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Tipton

Tipton Missouri

The Merrimac

Description of the Merrimac

Craney

Craney Island

Civil War Funeral

Naval Expedition

The Great Naval Expedition

Submarine

Civil War Submarine

Prison Richmond

The Richmond Prison

Rebel Cartoon

Rebel Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOVEMBER 2, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

693

THE LATE GENERAL E. D. BAKER, KILLED IN BATTLE OCTOBER 21, 1861.-[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

THE LATE GENERAL BAKER.

WE publish herewith, from a photograph by Brady, a portrait of the late GENERAL BAKER, who fell gallantly at the head of his brigade, at the battle near Leesburg, on 21st October. General Edward D. Baker was a native of the State of Illinois, and a great personal friend of President Lincoln. He was a representative in Congress from Illinois during the years 1846 and 1847, and was subsequently Senator for the new State of Oregon. General Baker's military career shows that this is not his first campaign, for we find that in July, 1846, he was Colonel of the Fourth Regiment of twelve months' Illinois Volunteers in the Mexican war, and commanded the brigade of General Shields after his fall. He distinguished himself at the battle of Cerro Gordo. He received his discharge in May, 1847. In a military capacity he was not again known until the present troubles commenced, when at the monster meeting in Union Square

he ascended the principal platform and boldly announced that, if he could get only a few followers, he would as boldly go forth and battle for the Union. How the words of the white-haired Senator told upon the loyal citizens of the North time has already proven. He organized the California regiment and led it to the field. When offered a Brigadier and even a Major Generalship, he refused both, preferring to be at the head of the regiment he had organized; and although acting in this battle as a General, he was simply the Colonel of the First California Regiment which started from this city.

THE LATE COLONEL SMITH.

WE publish herewith a portrait of the late COLONEL ABEL SMITH, who commanded the Thirteenth Regiment New York State Militia during their recent three months' campaign, and who met his death so unexpectedly last week at Mechanicsville, in this State.

Colonel Smith was an old resident of Brooklyn, and was greatly respected. On his return from his three months' service he undertook to reorganize the Thirteenth Regiment for the war. We quote from the Herald:

" He was one of the first to respond to the call of the President, and proceeded to Annapolis with his regiment, of which post he was the commander for a time. He then, as on previous occasions, displayed great courage and discretion, and discharged his onerous duties to the entire satisfaction of the War Department. For several weeks past Colonel Smith had been actively engaged in reorganizing the Thirteenth Regiment, numbers of which, who were ardently attached to their Colonel, having rejoined his command ; and it was in the act of rallying his men together that he met with the accident which, after a few hours of suffering, occasioned his death. The Colonel left New

York last week for Whitehall, where a number of recruits were waiting to be conveyed to Brooklyn for his regiment. On reaching Mechanicsville, early on Friday morning, he got out, that place being but a short distance from where the friends of his wife reside. In getting into the railroad car, while the train was in motion, he slipped his foot, and the concussion was so great that terrible fractures were produced in the shoulder, arms, and legs. As soon as the car passed over he raised himself up, and supposing that he was not seriously injured, he tore his coat-sleeve off with the hand which was not injured, at the same time remarking, 'I guess I am not hurt a great deal.' He was immediately conveyed to the hotel near by, and though every thing was done for him that medical skill and kindness could suggest, he died in the afternoon of the same day. The mother of the late gallant Colonel Ellsworth was in attendance, and did all in her power to alleviate the sufferings of Colonel Smith—stimulated, no doubt, by the remembrance of the sad end

of her noble son, whose memory will be ever green in the hearts of all true Americans. It is believed that the Colonel was unconscious during the time that elapsed between his being taken into the hotel and the moment the breathed his last. Intelligence of the accident was promptly communicated to his family, who reside in Lorimer Street, Williamsburgh, and his wife and son (Major Smith) proceeded to Mechanicsville, but arrived too late to see him alive. They accompanied his remains to Brooklyn."

The funeral of the deceased took place on Tuesday, October 22, from the residence of his family, corner of Lorimer and North Second streets. Colonel Smith was a member of Corner Stone Lodge F. A. M., and of De Witt Clinton Chapter R. A. M. Both bodies attended his funeral. His remains were taken to Cypress Hill Cemetery, the Fifth Brigade N. Y. S. M. acting as an escort. The Mayor and Common Council of Brooklyn and a large number of friends attended.

THE LATE COLONEL SMITH, OF THE THIRTEENTH REGIMENT N. Y. S. M. [PHOTOGRAPHED BY L. S. HICKS, WILLIAMSBURGH, L. I.]

UNIFORM OF COLONEL GEARY'S ARTILLERY (GENERAL BANKS'S DIVISION).-[SEE PAGE 703.]

General Baker
Colonel Baker
Geary Artillery

 

 

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