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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 2, 1861

This site features readable versions of the original issues of Harper's Weekly newspapers from 1861-1865. You can browse these newspapers by topic, or search on a specific topic using the search box on the bottom of this page. We hope you enjoy reading these old newspapers, and gaining perspective on the important people and places of the Civil War.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

The Merrimac

The Merrimac

Closing the Potomac

Rebels Close Potomac

Bolivar

Battle of Bolivar

Artillery

Geary's Artillery

Army of the Potomac

Army of the Potomac

Food

Civil War Food

Tipton

Tipton Missouri

The Merrimac

Description of the Merrimac

Craney

Craney Island

Civil War Funeral

Naval Expedition

The Great Naval Expedition

Submarine

Civil War Submarine

Prison Richmond

The Richmond Prison

Rebel Cartoon

Rebel Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOVEMBER 2, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

703

superexcited by the fumes of a vapor, look within yourself, and tell me if you do not feel an inward and unanswerable conviction that there is more reason to shun and to fear the creature you left asleep under the dead jaws of the giant serpent, than there would be in the serpent itself could the venom return to its breath ?"

I was silent, for I could not deny that that conviction had come to me.

" Henceforth, when you recover from the confusion or anger which now disturbs your impressions, you will be prepared to listen to my explanations and my recital in a spirit far different from that with which you would have received them before you were subjected to the experiment, which, allow me to remind you, you invited and defied. You will now, I trust, be fitted to become my confidant and my assistant—you will advise with me how, for the sake of humanity, we should act together against the incarnate lie, the anomalous prodigy which glides through the crowd in the image of joyous beauty. For the present I quit you. I have an engagement on worldly affairs in the town this night. I am staying at L-, which I shall leave for Derval Court to-morrow evening. Come to me there the day after to-morrow, at any hour that may suit you the best. Adieu."

Here Sir Philip Dorval rose and left the room. I made no effort to detain him. My mind was too occupied in striving to recompose itself, and account for the phenomena that had scared it, and for the strength of the impressions it still retained.

I sought to find natural and accountable causes for effects so abnormal.

Lord Bacon suggests that the ointments with which witches anointed themselves might have had the effect of stopping the pores and congesting the brain, and thus impressing the sleep of the unhappy dupes of their own imagination with dreams so vivid that, on waking, they were firmly convinced that they had been borne through the air to the Sabbat.

I remembered also having heard a distinguished French traveler—whose veracity was unquestionable—say that he had witnessed extraordinary effects produced on the sensorium by certain fumigations used by an African pretender to magic. A person, of however healthy a brain, subjected to the influence of these fumigations, was induced to believe that he saw the most frightful apparitions.

However extraordinary such effects, they were not incredible—not at variance with our notions of the known laws of nature. And to the vapor, or the odors which a powder applied to a lamp had called forth, I was, therefore, prepared to ascribe properties similar to those which Bacon's conjecture ascribed to the witches' ointment, and the French traveler to the fumigations of the African conjuror.

But as I came to that conclusion I was seized with an intense curiosity to examine for myself those chemical agencies with which Sir Philip Derval appeared so familiar ; to test the contents in that mysterious casket of steel. I also felt a curiosity no less eager, but more, in spite of myself, intermingled with fear, to learn all that Sir Philip had to communicate of the past history of Margrave. I could but suppose that the young man must indeed be a terrible criminal, for a person of years so grave, and station so high, to intimate accusations so vaguely dark, and to use means so extraordinary in order to enlist my imagination rather than my reason against a youth in whom there appeared none of the signs which suspicion interprets into guilt.

While thus musing I lifted my eyes and saw Margrave himself there, at the threshold of the ball-room-there, where Sir Philip had first pointed him out as the criminal he had come to L—to seek and disarm ; and now, as then, Margrave was the radiant centre of a joyous group ; not the young boy-god, Iacchus, amidst his nymphs could, in Grecian frieze or picture, have seemed more the type of the sportive, hilarious vitality of sensuous nature. He must have passed, unobserved by me, in my preoccupation of thought, from the museum and across the room in which I sat : and now there was as little trace in that animated countenance of the terror it had exhibited at Sir Philip's approach, as of the change it had undergone in my trance or my phantasy.

But he caught sight of me—left his young companions—came gayly to my side.

" Did you not ask me to go with you into that museum about half an hour ago, or did I dream that I went with you?"

" Yes, you went with me into that museum." "Then pray what dull theme did you select to set me asleep there ?"

I looked hard at him, and made no reply. Somewhat to my relief, I now heard my host's voice :

"Why, Fenwick, what has become of Sir Philip Derval ?"

" He has left ; he had business." And, as I spoke, again I looked hard on Margrave.

His countenance now showed a change; not surprise, not dismay, but rather a play of the lip, a flash of the eye, that indicated complacency—even triumph.

" So ! Sir Philip Derval. He is in L-;
he has been here to-night. So ! as I expected."

"Did you expect it?" said our host. "No one else did. Who could have told you ?"

" The movements of men so distinguished need never take us by surprise. I knew he was in Paris the other day. Natural he should come here. I was prepared for his coming."

Margrave here turned away toward the window, which he threw open and looked out.

"There is a storm in the air," said he, as he continued to gaze into the night.

Was it possible that Margrave was so wholly unconscious of what had passed in the museum as to include in oblivion even the remembrance

of Sir Philip Derval's presence before he had been rendered insensible, or laid asleep ? Was it now only for the first time that he learned of Sir Philip's arrival in L-, and visit to that house ? Was there any intimation of menace in his words and his aspect?

I felt that the trouble of my thoughts communicated itself to my countenance and manner; and, longing for solitude and fresh air, I quitted the house. When I found myself in the street, I turned round and saw Margrave still standing at the open window, but he did not appear to notice me ; his eyes seemed fixed abstractedly on space.

LINES ON DEATH.

THE phantom shade whom men call Death Pursues each thing that draweth breath On this fair earth :

He deems the man of pride and might, And insects fluttering in the light, Of equal worth.

He marks the man of many days,

Who hath grown old in the world's ways,
And bids him come:

The summons dread must be obey'd, Departure may not be delay'd-

That call is doom.

He tears the mother from her child, No cry of grief and anguish wild

Will move his breast: But calm and still his victims lie, No evil thing beneath the sky

May break their rest.

Full well he loves the battle-field, Armor of proof and massive shield He laughs to scorn :

The man of skill to forge the plate That might avert the shafts of fate Has ne'er been born.

Where hosts encounter hosts he stands,

A skeleton whose bony hands Do grasp a scythe :

While round about him raves the fight,

He views the fallen with delight, The dying writhe.

Upon the sea he wanders oft, And strikes the sailor who aloft

Doth furl the sail: Or on some shoal or rocky cape

He hurls the ship, while none escape

To tell the tale.

But not alone upon the wave,

Or on red fields where fall the brave, Does Death appear :

He watcheth nightly by our bed, And while we take our daily bread He standeth near.

O Death ! thou art a cruel foe, With whom we battle here below In weary strife :

The thought of thy sure victory Would take away what joy might be In our short life,

Did not within our bosoms dwell

A hope thy dart can never quell—A glorious hope:

Yes, heirs of immortality,

We dare with such a foe as thee,

0 Death ! to cope.

J. S.  

COLONEL GEARY'S ARTILLERY.

WE give on page 693 an engraving of the UNIFORMS OF THE OFFICERS AND PRIVATES OF BUNTING'S LIGHT ARTILLERY, one section of which is with Colonel Geary, and is now doing good service in General Banks's Division of the Army of the Potomac. The corps originally recruited in Rahway, New Jersey, joined the Ninth Regiment New York State Militia, and was attached to Colonel Stone's Brigade for a time, when it was raised to a full six-gun battery and armed with James's rifled cannon, with which it has rendered efficient aid in guarding the fords of the Potomac at Conrad's Ferry, Monocacy, Sandy Hook, and Point of Rocks. One section of this battery, under Lieutenant J. W. Martin, is a portion of the "Colonel Geary's Artillery" so frequently spoken of in the reports from the seat of war as being engaged in skirmishing with the enemy at Darnestown, Point of Rocks, Sandy Hill, and in the recent affair at Bolivar. The officers are, Captain T. B. Bunting, late First Lieutenant of the Seventh Regiment Engineer corps of this city, and Lieutenants W. M. Bramhall, J. W. Martin, George Browne, Jun., and Moses P. Clark, all of Rahway, New Jersey.

THE PRISON AT RICHMOND, VA.

ON page 689 we publish an illustration of HENRICO COUNTY JAIL, at Richmond, Virginia, where some Union prisoners have been confined. Our picture is from a sketch made by a prisoner who had been four months shut up in this jail, and who has lately made his escape. He describes the sufferings of the prisoners as severe, the food bad, and the treatment generally cruel. Every one has read the accounts of the Bull Run prisoners who were confined in the tobacco warehouses of Richmond, and were shot by the sentries for merely showing their faces at the window; also of the want of food and clothing ; of the jeers of the populace of Richmond when the prisoners took the air; of the

cruel sufferings of the wounded, etc., etc. When the war is over, this County Jail will take rank in history with the British prison-ships and the dungeons of the Revolution.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Portable Printing Offices

For the use of Business and Professional Men who would like to do their own Printing. Send for a Circular. ADAMS PRESS COMPANY, 117 Fulton Street, and 31 Park Row, New York.

"Something New for All."

GEN. GEO. B. McCLELLAN and our New Union Prize Gift Packages are to be wondered at. Seventy-five cents worth of indispensable articles for 25 cents. Agents are making from $5 to $10 per day. Agents wanted, male and female, everywhere. Address, with stamp for circular, RICKARDS & CO., 102 Nassau Street, New York.

LE BON TON—THE BEST LADIES' FASHION BOOK in the World. Specimen copies, with two valuable patterns, posted for 33 cents.

S. T. TAYLOR & SON, 407 Broadway, N.Y.

JEWELRY! JEWELRY! —The HeadQuarters for all Cash Buyers of fine and cheap Jewelry, Miniature Pins of all the heroes. Persons wishing to see Samples, enclose stamp for full particulars. W. A. HAYWARD (Manufacturing Jeweler), 208 Broadway.

ARTIFICIAL LEGS and ARMS. — (SELPHO'S Patent), 516 Broadway, New York. Send for a Circular.

$150 PER MON'T'H made by enterprising agents selling DOWNER'S HEMMER and SHIELD for hand sewing. Protects the finger and makes a beautiful hem. Sample sent on receipt of 25 cents. Address A. H. DOWNER, No. 442 Broadway.

The New Gas Lamps, For burning Warren's Carbo-Naptha and other Coal Oils as Self-Generating Gas Light, adapted for public and private buildings, gives great satisfaction. Sample lamp $3. "Vesper Lamps" and Camphene Lamps repaired and altered to burn these Oils. Send Stamp for Circular. CALLENDER & PERCE, 175 Broadway, N. Y., up stairs.

ARMY CONTRACTORS AND SUTLERS

can have transportation furnished to all parts of the West by the

ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY.

In connection with regular fast expresses, we are prepared to receipt for goods by four day and six day lines at low rates. For further information apply at our office.

ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY, 59 Broadway.

ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY'S ARMY AND SUTLERS' EXPRESS. For Washington, Annapolis, Fortress Monroe, Hatteras, and all other points where troops are stationed, leaves office 59 Broadway at 12:30 A.M., 5 P.M., and 6 P.M. Packages for soldiers taken for half price. Donation blankets for the army, when directed to a United States Quarter-master, will be carried free.

ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY, 59 Broadway.

Friends of Soldiers ! Send by Harnden's Express (the oldest Express), 74 Broadway, as they charge only half rates.

A sure cure for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, and Salt Rheum. Wholesale Agents F. C. WELLS & CO., 115 Franklin St., New York. Sold by Apothecaries everywhere.

Commercial Agents wanted. Large commission, honorable business. Circular sent. A.W. Harrison, Phila.

A 25 Cent Sewing Machine!

And 5 other curious inventions. Agents wanted every where. Descriptive Circulars sent free. Address SHAW & CLARK, Biddeford, Maine.

GAME, MEATS, FISH, &c., improved by the use of Lea & Perrin's Worcestershire Sauce. JOHN DUNCAN & SONS,

Union Square and 14th Street, Sole Agents.

COOLEY'S Cabinet Printing Office for small Printers and Amateurs, the best thing out. Send for Circulars. J. G. COOLEY & CO., 1 Spruce Street, N. Y.

Howard Association,
Philadelphia,

For the Relief of the Sick and distressed, afflicted with Virulent and Chronic Diseases. Medical advice given gratis by the Acting Surgeon. Valuable Reports on various Diseases, and on the NEW REMEDIES employed in the Dispensary, sent in sealed letter envelopes, free of charge. Address, Dr. J. SKILLIN HOUGHTON, Howard Association, No. 2 South Ninth St., Philad'a, Pa.

" Matrimony made Easy "—A new work, showing how either sex may be suitably married, irrespective of age or appearance, which can not fail—free for 25 cents. Address T. William & Co., Publishers, Box 2300, Philad.

The New Issue of Postage Stamps, of all denominations, for sale. Apply to HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin Square, N. Y.

$75 A MONTH !—I WANT TO HIRE AGENTS

in every County at $75 per month and expenses, to sell a new and cheap Sewing Machine. Address (with stamp)   S. MADISON, Alfred, Maine,

Cloaks!   Cloaks!
BRODIE

has made his
Grand Opening
of

Fall and Winter Cloaks,
at his

OLD STAND

300 Canal Street,

and

His Palace of Fashion,
Under the 5th Avenue Hotel,

Cor. of 23d Street,

New York.

Close of the Twenty-Third Volume.
HARPER'S NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE
For November, 1861.

CONTENTS.

BENEDICT ARNOLD. By BENSON J. LOSSING. ILLUSTRATIONS.—Portrait of Arnold.— Arnold crossing the St. Lawrence.— Arnold's Birth-Place.— The Assault on Quebec.—Place where Arnold was Wounded.—Leaving the Congress.—Map of the Battle on Lake Champlain—Arnold at Saratoga.—Meeting of Arnold and Andre.—Capture of Andre.—Arnold and Balcarras.

THE TENEMENT HOUSE. By FITZ-JAMES O'BRIEN. ILLUSTRATIONS. — The Dinner at Ormolu's. — The Alarm of Fire—Burning of the Tenement House. MAKING MONEY. ILLUSTRATIONS. —United States Custom-House and Assay Office, New York.—The Weigh-Room.—The Court-Yard.—The Melting-Room.—Old Crucibles.—Cupellation and Parting Silver.—The Assay Weigh-Room.—Granulating.—Melter and Refiner's Vault—Pouring out Acid.—The Parting House.—Interior of Vault.—Casting Fine Bars—Precipitating and Parting Silver.—Grinding and Separating the Dust.—Kent's Gold Separator.

THE WOMEN OF WEINSBERG. Illustrated. ABOUT THE FOX AND FOX-HUNTERS. By T. B. THORPE.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—A Fox-Hunter.—Portrait of Reynard.— The Meeting.— Riding to Cover.—The Chase. -The Death.—Over the Fence.

OLLY DOLLY.

NIGHT REVELERS.

MODERN AUSTRIA. By JOHN S. C. ABBOTT. WHEN THOU SLEEPEST. By CHARLOTTE BRONTE. CAUSE AND EFFECT.

THE GAME OF CHESS.

THE ANGEL SISTER.

ORLEY FARM. By ANTHONY TROLLOPE.—Illustrated by J. E. MILLAIS.

CHAPTER XXV. Mr. Furnival again at his Chambers. CHAPTER XXVI. " Why should I not?"

CHAPTER XXVII. Commerce.

CHAPTER XXVIII. Monkton Grange.

ILLUSTRATIONS. — "Why should I not?"--Monkton Grange.

ERNST II. OF SAXE-COBURG-GOTHA. By BAYARD TAYLOR.

MRS. STIRLING'S RECEPTION.

THE ADVENTURES OF PHILIP. By W. M. THACKERAY.

CHAPTER XXI. Treats of Dancing, Dining, Dying. CHAPTER XXII. Pulvis ut Umbra Sumus. ILLUSTRATIONS.—At the Last.—A Quarrel.—The End. MONTHLY RECORD OF CURRENT EVENTS.

EDITOR'S TABLE.

EDITOR'S EASY CHAIR.

OUR FOREIGN BUREAU.

EDITOR'S DRAWER.—(With Eight Illustrations.) MR. DOWNEY IN SEARCH OF PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Bowling.—The Result.—Skating.—Its Effect.—Riding.—The End.—Rowing.—The Trial.—Ball-Playing.—The Work—Bathing—Lager. FASHIONS FOR NOVEMBER.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Cloak and Boy's Dress. — Evening Costume and Walking Dress.

Any Number will be sent by Mail, post-paid, for Twenty-five Cents. Any Volume, comprising Six Numbers, neatly bound in Cloth, will be sent by Mail, to any part of the United States within 3000 miles of New York, post-paid, for Two Dollars per Volume. Complete Sets will be sent by Express, the freight at the charge of the purchaser, at a Discount of Twenty-five per Cent. from the above rate. Twenty-three Volumes, bound uniformly, extending from June, 1850, to November, 1861, are now ready.

HARPER'S WEEKLY will be sent gratuitously for one month—as a specimen—to any one who applies for it. Specimen Numbers of the MAGAZINE will also be sent gratuitously.

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year . . . . . . . $3.00

Two Copies for One Year . . . . . . 5.00
Three or more Copies for One Year (each) . 2.00
And an Extra Copy, gratis, for every Club of EIGHT SUBSCRIBERS.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

HARPER'S WEEKLY.
Single Copies Six Cents.

Notwithstanding the great amount of space devoted to Illustrations of the War, Harper's Weekly commenced in No. 241, dated August 10th, A NEW AND THRILLING SERIAL TALE, by Sir EDWARD BULWER LYTTON, entitled,

"A STRANGE STORY,"
which will be continued from week to week till completed.
TERMS.

One Copy for One Year . . . . $2.50

Two Copies for One Year . . . . 4.00
Harper's Weekly and Harper's Magazine, one year, $4.00.

HARPER'S WEEKLY will be sent gratuitously for one month—as a specimen—to any one who applies for it. Specimen Numbers of the MAGAZINE will also be sent gratuitously.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

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