Samuel F. Dupont

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 30, 1861

For your research and study, we have posted online versions of our collection of Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. These papers give you unique insight into the key events and people of the Civil War. We hope you enjoy this extensive archive of Civil War material.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

General Halleck

General Halleck

Halleck Biography

General Halleck Biography

Confederate Elections

Davis & Stephens Reelected

Making Artillery Shells

Artillery Shells

Map of South Carolina Coast

Beaufort

Capture of Beaufort, South Carolina

Dupont

Samuel F. Dupont

Slidell and Mason

Capture of Slidell and Mason

Springfield

Springfield, Missouri

Hilton Head

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Beaufort, South Carolina

The Beaufort Naval Expedition

Fort Walker

Attack on Fort Walker and Beauregard

Runyon and Albany

Forts Runyon and Albany

Beaufort Cartoon

Last Man in Beaufort

 
 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[NOVEMBER 30, 1861.

764

CAPTAIN S. F. DUPONT, U.S.N.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.-[SEE PAGE 763.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL T. W. SHERMAN, U.S.A.-FROM A PHOTOGRAPH.—[SEE PAGE 763.]

greatest good. I was unhappy when disaster and disappointment came."

"But a manly philosophy sustained you," said I.

"It were better called religion," he answered, his voice falling into a lower key. "I tried philosophy, but it wouldn't do; and so, in my weakness and pain, I went up higher, to the Strong for strength."

His face lighted up beautifully.

"And found Him a friend that sticketh closer than a brother," I remarked.

" Yes, in truth. I am poor ; but "His are the cattle upon a thousand hills."

"You have children?" I said.

" Yes, and good children, thank God! Loving children !"

His eyes glistened as he spoke.

And this was the man who had not succeeded ; this was the man of whom some spoke with pity,

some with indifference, and some even with contempt as of no account. But Payson was " all right!" I referred to Payson.

" Poor man !" was the reply. " I never look at him without a feeling of pity."

" He has succeeded largely."

" There is a difference of opinion about that," said Melleville. " Some think he has failed miserably."

'' He is rich."

"In money, and in nothing else; and of all riches that comes with fewest blessings. If not accompanied by riches of the mind and heart, gold always curses its possessor. So I read in the book of human life. It has cursed Payson. I would not exchange places with him, taking his consciousness and state of mind, for the wealth of a thousand worlds. No ! no ! no !"

He spoke with earnestness.

" I have seen him," said I.

"Well, how did he impress you?"

"As to all that is worth living for, I should say with you that his life has been a miserable failure."

"And so are the lives of thousands," he answered, "whom the world points out as its most successful men. Get close to them ; see them in their true individuality ; in their homes, if you can approach that near, and you will see poor wrecks of manhood, bloated selfishness, tormenting itself with ill-nature, or mad with pain from some eating cancer of the soul that goes on, day and night, with its work of ruin."

I saw these two men frequently during the few days that I lingered in the old familiar places, and when I went away it was with no nicely-balanced question in my thought as to which was the truly successful man.

SHELLS.

As the bombardment of the Port Royal forts has directed attention to the subject of shells, we devote page 758 to the illustration of their manufacture. In the centre of the picture will be seen the workmen in a national foundry filling and finishing shells ; in the corner on the left a workman is seen pouring in the lead, the direction of which is shown in a small diagram on the right at the top of the picture ; the other diagrams and pictures illustrate the various parts of the shell. At the bottom on the right is seen the great Union shell, for the Union gun at Fortress Monroe : it stands about two feet three inches high. The shells used at Port Royal were fired with fuses calculated to explode shortly after the shell landed ; other shells explode on striking their object. The negroes at Port Royal called them "Yankee dirt plows!"

TORCH-LIGHT PROCESSION OF GENERAL BLENKER'S DIVISION IN HONOR OF THE NEW COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF.—DRAWN BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.-[SEE PAGE 767.]

Samuel F. Dupont
General T. W. Sherman
Blenker's Division

 

 

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