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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 16, 1861

This site features online, readable versions of the Harper's Weekly newspaper published during the Civil War. These issues are full of incredible Civil War content, including stunning wood cut images and stories written by eye-witnesses to the historic events of the war. Reading these original newspapers yields insight into the war that simply can not be obtained in any other way.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

Lincoln and Scott

Abraham Lincoln and Winfield Scott

Scott's Resignation

General Scott's Resignation

McClellan Takes Command of Union Army

McClellan Takes Command of Union Army

Sherman on the Wabash

General Sherman on the Wabash

Civil War Scouts

Scouting Party

Missourie

War in Southwestern Missouri

Slave Hunters

Slave Hunters

Cotton Planter

Cotton Planter Cartoon

Union Navy

The Union Navy

Battle of Springfield

Battle of Springfield Missouri

Siegel Crossing the Osage

General Siegel Crossing the Osage River

Army Beef

Army Beef on the Long Bridge

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[NOVEMBER 16, 1861.

732

BRIGADIER-GENERAL KELLEY, OF VIRGINIA.
[FROM A PHOTOGRAPH FURNISHED BY MR. G. ANTHONY, OF NEW YORK.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL A. McDOWELL McCOOK.
[SKETCHED BY MR. H. MOSLER.]

GENERAL KELLEY.

WE publish above a portrait of the gallant GENERAL KELLEY, of Virginia, whose recent exploit at Romney we noticed last week. General Kelley is a native of New England, who settled in Western Virginia some twenty years since, and became a wealthy and a leading citizen. When the war broke out he at once volunteered, and obtained the command of the First Virginia Regiment. At the battle of Philippi he was severely wounded, and for some time his life was despaired of. He has since recovered, and is doing gallant service again under the Stars and Stripes. He is now in command at Romney.

GENERAL McDOWELL McCOOK.

BRIGADIERcGENERAL A. M'DOWELL M'COOK, whose portrait we publish above, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, April 22, 1831, was appointed to West Point in 1848, and graduated in 1852. He was appointed Brevet Second Lieutenant in the Third Infantry, and ordered to the Department of New Mexico. He took an active part in all the prominent Indian campaigns in that department

up to February, 1858, when he was ordered to West Point, where he served as principal assistant instructor in infantry tactics, and also in the art of war, until the fall of Sumter. He then applied for permission to take the field, and was ordered to his native State to muster in volunteers for the three months' service. On his thirtieth birthday he was elected and commissioned Colonel of the First Ohio Volunteers. He commanded this regiment at the battle of Bull Run, where it formed part of Schenck's brigade. He returned to Ohio with the regiment, mustered it out of the service, and recruited it again at Dayton, Ohio. He was appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers September 3, 1861, and ordered to the Department of the Cumberland, and he now commands the advance in front of Buckner.

He has five brothers in the army, a sixth having been killed at the battle of Bull Run. One of them is Colonel of the Ninth Ohio, now in active service in Western Virginia.

SLAVE-HUNTERS IN TROUBLE.

ONE of our Missouri correspondents, Mr. Bill D. Travis, has sent us the sketch which we reproduce

Bird's Point, Missouri, by entering the camp and kidnapping negroes, under the pretense that they were runaway slaves. They had been turned out of camp once or twice, and warned not to return. One day in October they were, nevertheless, discovered in the camp of the Twenty-second Illinois Regiment ; they even attempted to carry off an unfortunate negro whom they pronounced to be a slave, but who protested that he was free. The soldiers attempted to argue the point, but were brutally denounced by the slave-hunters as " bloody abolitionists," negro thieves, etc. This sort of thing at last roused the Illinois boys beyond bearing, and they proceeded to punish the foul-mouthed rascals. Our correspondent thinks, no doubt justly, that their career might have been cut abruptly short had not the noise of the affray reached the ears of Colonel Dougherty, who immediately had the slave-hunters sent out of camp under guard of a file of soldiers. They are not likely to be caught there again.

It is one thing to make rules for the guidance of Generals, and another to get our troops to execute them. When General Sherman gets down

into the South, and is molested by night attacks from the rebels, led by negro guides. we fear that all the rules in the world will not suffice to persuade his troops to aid or tolerate any way " hunters for slaves."

A SCOUTING PARTY.

WE publish on page 726 a very striking illustration of one of the most exciting duties which now devolve upon our troops—scouting. Every day each brigade, and often each regiment, sends out a small party of tried soldiers under an officer selected for his courage and coolness, to ascertain what, if any, changes have taken place in the position of the enemy. The duty is one of no inconsiderable danger, as the enemy's sharp-shooters are always on the look-out for such expeditions, and, lying concealed in thickets, not unfrequently manage to shoot several of the scouts before they are detected. At and near Fortress Monroe these scouting expeditions have proved unusually disastrous, having cost many valuable lives. The very danger and enterprise of the duty, however, renders it attractive to young soldiers and to ambitious subalterns.

TWO SLAVE-HUNTERS EXPELLED FROM THE CAMP OF THE TWENTY-SECOND ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS AT BIRD'S POINT, MISSOURI.-[SKETCHED BY MR. BILL TRAVIS.]

General Kelley
General McCook
Slave Hunters

 

 

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