General Sherman on the Wabash

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 16, 1861

This site features online, readable versions of the Harper's Weekly newspaper published during the Civil War. These issues are full of incredible Civil War content, including stunning wood cut images and stories written by eye-witnesses to the historic events of the war. Reading these original newspapers yields insight into the war that simply can not be obtained in any other way.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

Lincoln and Scott

Abraham Lincoln and Winfield Scott

Scott's Resignation

General Scott's Resignation

McClellan Takes Command of Union Army

McClellan Takes Command of Union Army

Sherman on the Wabash

General Sherman on the Wabash

Civil War Scouts

Scouting Party

Missourie

War in Southwestern Missouri

Slave Hunters

Slave Hunters

Cotton Planter

Cotton Planter Cartoon

Union Navy

The Union Navy

Battle of Springfield

Battle of Springfield Missouri

Siegel Crossing the Osage

General Siegel Crossing the Osage River

Army Beef

Army Beef on the Long Bridge

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[NOVEMBER 16, 1861.

724

Gen. Viele.

Gen. Wright.

Gen. Stevens.

Capt. Davis.

Capt. Rogers.

THE GREAT EXPEDITION—GENERAL SHERMAN GIVING HIS FINAL ORDERS TO HIS BRIGADIER-GENERALS ON BOARD THE "WABASH."—[SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.]

THE GREAT NAVAL EXPEDITION.

WE continue our series of illustrations of the Great Naval Expedition. Above we give a picture of the final conference between General Sherman, who commands the Expedition, and his principal officers on board the Wabash; and below we present an engraving of a similar conference between General Viele, commanding a brigade, and the Colonels and staff officers under his command. The large picture opposite will convey to the reader

some idea of the vessels composing the Expedition as they lay at anchor at Hampton Roads, between Fortress Monroe and the Rip Raps, previous to their departure. The captain of the Thomas Swan, who arrived here on 30th, states that on Monday afternoon at five o'clock the sailing vessels were getting under way, and when the Thomas Swan left the steamers were also preparing to take their departure. At midnight of the 28th, off Hog Island, he passed four steamers bound south. We also, by telegraphic dispatches, learn that the great fleet sailed on Tuesday morning, the Wabash taking the

lead at daylight, when the gun was fired as a signal, and the Cahawba bringing up the rear. The vessels, about fifty in number, formed in line a few miles down the Roads, and went out between the Capes in splendid style. The Baltic had the Ocean Express in tow, the Vanderbilt the Great Republic, and the Illinois the Golden Eagle. The morning was the most beautiful of the season, and the scene the finest ever witnessed on this continent.

Previous to the departure General Sherman removed his quarters from the Atlantic to the frigate Wabash. He took with him Assistant Adjutant-

General Captain Pelouze, and a number of others. —At the hour this page goes to press we have no news from the Expedition later than Saturday evening, at which time the fleet was seen pleasantly sailing toward Bull Bay, 25 miles north of Charleston, S. C., by Lieut. Braine, of the Monticello, who arrived at Old Point with the news on the afternoon of 4th. One vessel only, the Belvidere, had been injured by the gale, and had returned to Old Point. Lieut. Braine feels certain the Expedition landed on Sunday morning. The coast there is not strongly fortified.

Gen. Viele.

Col. Perry.

CONSULTATION BETWEEN GENERAL VIELE AND THE OFFICERS OF HIS BRIGADE BEFORE THE DEPARTURE.—[SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.]

Picture
Picture

 

 

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