Ben McCulloch

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, September 7, 1861

This 1861 Harper's Weekly newspaper has a variety of important content on the Civil War. The cover has a nice illustration of a Southern Belle. The paper has a story on Ben McCulloch, and a map of the Civil War. The paper also has a nice picture of Winchester, Virginia, and Fort Lafayette.

(Scroll Down to see full page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

Southern Belle

Southern Belle

Politics

Political Catechism

Galveston

Galveston Bombardment

Blockade

Blockade

McCullock and Siegel

Ben McCulloch

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Recruiting

Loudon on the Potomac

Loudon Heights

Ben McCulloch

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War in the West

Map of the Civil War in the West

Ft. Layafette

Fort Lafayette in New York Harbor

Winchester

Winchester, VA

Zouaves New York

Second New York Fire Zouaves

Napoleon and Clotilde

Prince Napoleon

Cartoons of War

War Cartoons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPTEMBER 7, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

565

BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANZ SIEGEL.—[FROM A SKETCH BY OUR ARTIST IN THE WEST.]

THE REBEL GENERAL BEN McCULLOCH.—FROM A PHOTOGRAPH.-[SEE PAGE 571.]

BRIG.-GENERAL FRANZ SIEGEL.

WE publish herewith a portrait of this now famous General, from a sketch by one of our artists in the West. General Siegel was born in 1824, at Baden, in Germany, and was educated at the Military School of Carlsruhe. In 1847 he held the rank of Chief Adjutant, and was universally allowed to be one of the most promising officers, and perhaps the best artillerist in Germany. When

the revolution broke out in 1848, he joined it at once, and lost his commission in consequence. He obtained service, however, among the revolutionists, and soon rose to the chief command of their armies. When the reaction took place, the sovereigns raised an overwhelming force to crush out Siegel. He fought them with 30,000 men against 80,000, and, more fortunate than at Springfield, he brought off every one of his guns. Peace soon left the General without an army, and he emigrated

shortly afterward to this country. Here he entered the academy of a Monsieur Dulon, whose daughter he afterward married. A few years since he was chosen professor in a college at St. Louis, where he taught among other things the art of war to his pupils. When the rebellion broke out, General Siegel was one of the first of the gallant Germans of Missouri who rallied in support of the Government. He, and Blair, and Boernstein commanded the first three regiments of Volunteers

raised at St. Louis. He subsequently co-operated, with vigor and ability, with the late lamented Lyon, and was with him up to the eve of the battle of Springfield. After the death of Lyon, General Siegel commanded our army, and led the retreat to Rolla, where he was at latest advices. General Siegel is a man of whom much is expected. If General McCulloch is attempting any rash proceedings in his vicinity, General Siegel will probably give a good account of him.

BAR OF THE SPOTTSWOOD HOUSE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.—[SEE PAGE 571.]

General Franz Siegel
Ben McCulloch
Spottswood House, Richmond

 

 

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