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Civil War Harper's Weekly, April 5, 1862

This is part of our extensive online collection of Harper's Weekly newspapers. These papers have incredible content, including dramatic drawings made by eye-witnesses to the key battles and events in the Civil War.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Blockade Runner

Blockade Runner

What to do with Freed Slaves

What to do with the Negroes

Fort Craig

Fort Craig Defeat

Island Number 10

Bombardment of Island Number Ten

Tennessee

War in Tennessee

Camp Douglas

Camp Douglas

Battle of Newbern

Battle of Newbern

Galena

Iron-Clad Galena

Island Number Ten (10)

Attack of Island Number Ten

Battle of Newbern

Battle of Newbern

Morris

Lieutenant Morris

Rebel Prisoners

Rebel Prisoners

Civil War Cartoons

Civil War Cartoons

 

 

 

APRIL 5, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

223

mentioned this circumstance with an air of sentimental resignation, and listened to Mr. Vanstone's boisterous rejoicings over his new prospects with a mild and mute surprise. His gentle melancholy of look and manner greatly assisted his personal advantages. In his own effeminate way he was more handsome than ever that evening. His soft brown eyes wandered about the room with a melting tenderness; his hair was beautifully brushed; his delicate hands hung over the arms of his chair with a languid grace. He looked like a convalescent Apollo. Never, on any previous occasion, had he practiced more successfully the social art which he habitually cultivated—the art of casting himself on society in the character of a well-bred Incubus, and conferring an obligation on his fellow-creatures by allowing them to sit under him. It was undeniably a dull evening. All the talking fell to the share of Mr. Vanstone and Miss Garth. Mrs. Vanstone was habitually silent; Norah kept herself obstinately in the back-ground; Magdalen was quiet and undemonstrative beyond all former precedent. From first to last she kept rigidly on her guard. The few meaning looks that she cast on Frank flashed at him like lightning, and were gone before any one else could see them. Even when she brought him his tea, and when, in doing so, her self-control gave way under the temptation which no woman can resist—the temptation of touching the man she loves—even then she held the saucer so dextrously that it screened her hand. Frank's self-possession was far less steadily disciplined; it only lasted as long as he remained passive. When he rose to go—when he felt the warm, clinging pressure of Magdalen's fingers round his hand, and the lock of her hair, which she slipped into it at the same moment, he became awkward and confused. He might have betrayed Magdalen and betrayed himself but for Mr. Vanstone, who innocently covered his retreat by following him out, and patting him on the shoulder all the way. "God bless you, Frank!" cried the friendly voice, that never had a harsh note in it for any body. "Your fortune's waiting for you. Go in, my boy—go in and win!"

"Yes," said Frank. "Thank you. It will be rather difficult to go in and win at first. Of course, as you have always told me, a man's business is to conquer his difficulties, and not to talk about them. At the same time, I wish I didn't feel quite so loose as I do in my figures. It's discouraging to feel loose in one's figures.—Oh, yes; I'll write and tell you how I get on. I'm very much obliged by your kindness, and very sorry I couldn't succeed with the engineering. I think I should have liked engineering better than trade. It can't be helped now, can it? Thank you again. Good-by!"

So he drifted away into the misty commercial future, as aimless, as helpless, as gentlemanlike as ever.

REBEL PRISONERS AT CHICAGO.

WE publish on page 215, from a sketch by Mr. True Williams of Chicago, a picture of the REBEL PRISONERS AT CAMP DOUGLAS, near Chicago.

Several hundred of the prisoners taken at Fort Donelson, comprising Alabamians, Mississippians, and Texans, were sent there soon after their capture, and are now held there. The Chicago Tribune thus describes their appearance:

Parties who were fortunate enough to obtain entrance to Camp Douglas yesterday forenoon might have seen standing, shivering in the snow, in about the centre of the parade-ground, a collection of men wearing all the colors of the rainbow upon their backs in the shape of raiment. There were seven or eight hundred prisoners in the group. Their clothes had been intended for a warmer country, and their frames were all unused to the cold weather of a northern climate; hence the prisoners looked pale, and actually had attacks of ague chills as they stood awaiting the preparation of their barracks. It was a matter for contemplation. A week ago these men were fighting under the serpent flag at Donelson. To-day they stood conquered, yet not entirely disheartened, beneath the stars and stripes, hundreds of miles from their homes and scenes of disastrous battle.

A more wobegone appearing set of men it would be difficult for the reader to imagine. Compared with the laborers we are in the habit of seeing upon our public roads they would suffer somewhat, being less hardy and healthy in build and complexion. It may have been from exposure and low diet, but they were all sallow faced, sunken eyed, and apparently famishing. Some of them had food with them, and were eating of it as they stood. Others were rigging extemporaneous windlasses for a well and filling their canteens. The majority, however, stood gazing about the place, perfectly willing to be conversed with, and as willing to answer all questions put to them by their numerous visitors. These visitors were mainly respectful to the fallen foe. In fact, these men, and those who had been quartered in the southern portion of the grounds known as Brackett's Camp, appeared to be satisfied with their lot, and were free to say they had not been better treated since enlistment, or more comfortably housed and better fed than the prospect was they would be at Camp Douglas as prisoners of war.

The uniforms of the Confederate prisoners are just no uniforms at all, lacking all the characteristics of infantry cavalry, or artillery costume, in being wholly uniform in color, cut, fashion, and manufacture. Some have coats of a butternut color, cut in regular sack style, and others fashioned, like those of our soldiers, as jackets or frocks. The pants are as diversified in color. Many of them have no overcoats at all, and supply their place with horse blankets, hearth-rugs, coverlets, pieces of carpet, coffee sacks, etc., etc. Their knapsacks consist of bags of all colors and sizes, comparing well with their coats and hats. The same remarks apply equally well to their canteens and other accoutrements, no half dozen of which seem to have been made at the same manufactory.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

SODA-WATER APPARATUS, new and Second hand, of every description. Druggists, Confectioners, and Bottlers, send for an illustrative and descriptive catalogue and price-list at WILLIAM GEE'S, Nos. 6 and 7 New Haven Railroad Buildings, corner of Elm and Franklin Streets, New York.

AGENTS, Army Traders, and the Speculating Classes generally. Low priced Watches and cheap Jewelry of the most saleable variety. Price lists sent free. Address   HUBBARD BROS., NEW YORK.

You must Notice,

That the name of the firm of W. Forsyth & Co. is changed to J. H. Winslow & Co., Mr. Forsyth having retired. Business continued the same, and all Certificates with the name of W. Forsyth & Co. attached are good, and will be redeemed by us alone, with the same promptness and faithfulness as heretofore, on their being returned to us.

100,000
WATCHES, CHAINS, &c., &c

Worth $500,000.

To be sold for One Dollar each, without regard to value, and not to be paid for till you know what you are to get.

Splendid List!!

Of Articles to be Sold for One Dollar each.

100 Gold Hunting  Watc..$100,00 each

100 " Watches .......................60,00 each

200 Ladies' Gold Watches .....35,00 each

500 Ladies and Gents Watches 15,00 each

5000 Vest Chains ....5,00 to 10,00 each

3000 Gold Bracelets.5,00 to 10,00 each

3000 " " " .................3,00 to 5,00 each

3000 Cameo Brooches ...4,00 to 6,00 each

3000 Mosaic Brooches ..4,00 to 6,00 each

3060 Lava and Brooches 4,00 to 6,00 each

3000 Coral Brooches.4,00 to 6,00 each

3000 Cameo Ear Drops ...4,00 to 6,00 each

3000 Mosaic Ear Drops ...4,00 to 6,00 each

3000 Lava  Ear Drops ..4,00 to 6,00 each

3000 Coral Ear Drops 4,00 to 8,00 each

5100 Gents' Breast Pins ..2,50 to 8,00 each

3000 Watch Keys .............2,00 to 6,00 each

5000 Fob and Ribbon  2,00 to 6,00 each

5000 Sets Bosom Studs 2,50 to 6,00 each

5000 Sleeve Buttons ........2,50 to 6,00 each

7000 Plain Rings ..............2,50 to 5,00 each

7000 Stone Set Rings .......2,50 to 6,00 each

7000 Lockets ................2,50 to 10,00 each

10000 Ladies Jewelry 5,00 to 10,00 each

10000 Gold Pens, 14 Carats and War'd ..4,00 to 5,00 each
(with Silver Mounted Holders.)

All of the above list of Goods will be sold for one dollar each. Certificates of all the various articles, stating what each one can have, will be placed in envelopes and sealed. These envelopes will be sent by mail, as ordered, without regard to choice. On receipt of the Certificate, you will see what you can have, and then it is at your option to send one dollar and take the article or not.

In all transactions by mail, we shall charge for forwarding the Certificates, paying postage, and doing the business, 25 cents each, which must be enclosed when the certificate is sent for. Five Certificates will be sent for $1, eleven for $2, thirty for $5, sixty-five for $10, and one hundred for $15.

AGENTS.—Those acting as Agents will be allowed ten cents on every certificate ordered by them, provided their remittance amounts to one dollar. Agents will collect 25 cents for every Certificate and remit 15 cents to us, either in cash or postage stamps. Great caution should be used by our correspondents in regard to giving their correct address, Town, County, and State. Address

J. H. WINSLOW & CO.,

208 Broadway,

P. O. Box 5029,   New York. N.B. We wish it distinctly understood that all articles of jewelry not giving perfect satisfaction can be returned and the money will be refunded.

A Certain Cure for Nervous Debility,
Neuralgia, &c.

Laurie's Chinese Life Pills.

This wonderful remedy is chiefly composed from the essence of a plant that grows in the tea districts of China, the use of which, as prescribed by learned Chinese physicians as an antidote to the effects of eating opium, &c., was discovered by Dr. Adam Laurie, M.R.C.S., while attached to the French and British Embassies at Hong Kong, and by him introduced into European practice.

These pills take no effect as a cathartic, but act specifically on the blood and nervous centres, are a speedy and infallible remedy for NEURALGIA, TIODOLOREX, ST. VITUS' DANCE, DYSPEPSIA, LANGUOR, LASSITUDE, DEPRESSION OF SPIRITS, SICK-HEADACHE, IRRITABILITY, EXCITEMENT, and all diseases from impure blood or nervous derangement, and may be taken with entire safety by the most delicate lady or tender child.

Price One Dollar per box of forty pills, or large boxes of a hundred for Two Dollars. Sent post free, by mail, on receipt of remittance; or obtained personally from

GEO. BULPIN,

General Agent for the United States, 429 Broadway, N. Y.

Head-Quarters for Cheap

Jewelry.

HEAD-QUARTERS FOR BRACELETS. HEAD-QUARTERS FOR LOCKETS. HEAD-QUARTERS FOR RINGS.

HEAD-QUARTERS FOR VEST CHAINS. HEAD-QUARTERS FOR NECK CHAINS.

HEAD-QUARTERS FOR ALL KINDS OF SETS. HEAD-QUARTERS FOR ALL KINDS OF PINS. HEAD-QUARTERS FOR MINIATURE PINS OF ALL

THE GENERALS. Enclose stamp for full particulars. W. A. HAYWARD, MANUFACTURING JEWELER, 208 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

WATCHES.

10,000 for sale, at Wholesale prices. Enclose stamp for descriptive Circular. J. L. Ferguson, 208 Broadway, N.Y.

AGENTS MAKE MOST MONEY, and give entire satisfaction, by selling our "PRIZE STATIONERY AND JEWELRY PACKAGES." Circulars free. P. HASKINS & CO., 36 Beekman St., N. Y.

Wedding Cards and Note Papers at J. EVERDELL'S celebrated Engraving Establishment, 302 Broadway, cor. Duane Street, N. Y. Samples by mail.

Best Thing for Agents.

Scofield's Variety Stationery Gift Packages contain more paper and better gifts than any in market. Send stamp for particulars, or 35c. for sample to

C. W. SCOFIELD, Bookseller, Geneva, N. Y.

Useful and Economical. — Hegeman & Co.'s Benzine, which instantly removes Paint, Grease Spots, &c., and cleans Gloves, Ribbons, Silks, &c., equal to new without injury to the most delicate color or fabric, only 25 cents per bottle. Sold by Druggists. Be sure and get the genuine. Prepared by HEGEMAN & CO., Chemists and Druggists, New York.

A New Edition of

Harper's War Map

Now Ready.

Price Six Cents.

Sent by mail on receipt of price.

HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.

The New Issue of Postage Stamps, of all denominations, for sale. Apply to HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin Square, N. Y.

"MOUSTACHES and WHISKERS in 42 days." This GREAT SECRET and many others in a new BOOK, mailed free, for [coin] 20c. Eight for $1. Address C. E. HUNTER & CO., Hinsdale, N. H.

AGENTS HAVE YOU SEEN THISTLE & CO.'S NEW UNION PRIZE STATIONERY PACKAGE? IF NOT SEND STAMP FOR OUR CIRCULAR, AND GET THE BEST AND CHEAPEST IN THE MARKET.

THISTLE & CO., 130 NASSAU STREET, N. Y.

GRAND OPENING
OF

PARIS CLOAKS AND MANTILLAS,

On Wednesday, April 2nd,
BEING
THE FIRST IMPORTATIONS, FOR SPRING,
OF THE

United States Cloak and Mantilla Store,
304 and 306 CANAL STREET.

 

GEO. CAREY has the honor to announce the arrival of his first importations of

PARIS AND LONDON

CLOAKS AND MANTILLAS,

personally selected by Mr. W. B. MACKENZIE from the leading Magazines in those cities, and who has spared neither energy nor expense in his search after novelty combined with tasteful excellence.

The garments of my own manufacture will be found worthy the minute examination of Ladies, being for the most part

EXCLUSIVE IN STYLE,

UNIQUE IN MANUFACTURE,

AND POPULAR IN PRICES. Ladies are invited freely to view my display, which will conduce to the advantage of my customers and the popularity and renown of the

United States Cloak and Mantilla Store,
304 and 306 CANAL STREET, NEW YORE.

GEO. CAREY.

N. B. Remember Wednesday, April 2nd, 1862.

Commercial Travelers and Agents
Wanted to Sell our

25 Cent Portfolio Package.

Contents—18 Sheets Note Paper, 18 Envelopes, 1 Penholder, 1 Pen, 1 Pencil, 1 Blotting Pad, 100 Recipes, 1 War Hymn, 5 Engravings, 1 New Method for Computing Interest.—2 Fashionable Embroidery Designs for Collars, 4 for Under-Sleeves, 2 for Under-Skirts, 1 for Corner of Handkerchief, 2 for Cuffs, 1 for Silk Purse, 1 for Child's Sack, 1 for Ornamental Pillow Case, 1 Puzzle Garden, and ONE BEAUTIFUL ARTICLE OF JEWELRY. $10 a day can be realized. Send stamp for Circular of wholesale prices.

WEIR & CO., 43 South Third Street, Phila., Pa.  

$75 A MONTH!—I WANT TO HIRE AGENTS in every County at $75 per month and expenses, to sell a new and cheap Sewing Machine. Address (with stamp)   S. MADISON, Alfred, Maine.

A sure cure for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, and Salt Rheum. Wholesale Agents F. C. WELLS & CO., 115 Franklin St., New York. Sold by Apothecaries everywhere.

THE ALBION,

A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER.
Established in 1822,

DEVOTED TO

NEWS, POLITICS, CRITICISM, AND GENERAL
LITERATURE.

PRICE $3 PER ANNUM; 6 CENTS PER COPY.

Send for Specimen Copies to the ALBION OFFICE, 16 Beekman Street, New York.

Le Bon Ton Fashion Book for April. Sent free for 50 cents. S. T. TAYLOR & SON, 407 Broadway, N. Y.

Rheumatism.—All those afflicted with Rheumatism, Gout, Neuralgia, Chilblains, Cold and Frost-bitten Feet, and all Nervous Diseases, by wearing Mettam & Co.'s Patent Galvano Electro Metallic Insoles, will find immediate and permanent cure from their use, never having yet failed in hundreds of cases. Office 429 Broadway. Agent for Philadelphia, J. S. SANSON, 2013 Girard Avenue. Send for a Circular.

BACK NUMBERS of Harper's Weekly and Magazine always on hand at J. P. TRENWITH'S, No. 103 South Third Street, Philadelphia.

FRIENDS OF SOLDIERS!

All Articles for Soldiers at Baltimore, Washington, Hilton Head, Beaufort, and all places occupied by Union troops, should be sent, at half rates, by HARNDEN'S EXPRESS, No. 74 Broadway. Sutlers charged low rates.

A MOST POWERFUL ARM, WHICH CAN BE carried constantly about the person without inconvenience or danger. Length four inches, scarcely more than that of the barrels. It is the most compact, safe, and powerful Pocket Revolver ever made; weighs only eight ounces, charged with cartridges, which can be purchased in hardware stores, each barrel rifled, gain twist and sighted. Will penetrate one inch of pine at one hundred and fifty yards. Send for illustrated Circular.

Retail price, Plated Frame, with 100 cartridges, $10.00

" " Blued Frame, " " " 9.50

Trade supplied. T. W. MOORE, 426 B'way, N. Y.

WEDDINGS supplied with the new style of Marriage

Cards and Envelopes, by A. DEMAREST, Engraver, 182 Broadway. Seals and stamps.

Chapped Hands, Face, Lips, &c.— CERTAIN CURE AND PREVENTIVE.—HEGEMAN & CO.'S CAMPHOR ICE, with GLYCERINE, will keep the skin soft in the coldest weather. Sold by druggists generally. Price 25 cents. Sent by mail on receipt of 30 cents. HEGEMAN & CO., Nos. 161, 399, 511, and 750 Broadway, New York.

To Sutlers and Others.

An article in brisk demand!

ANDREWS' YEAST POWDER, put up in cans, with full directions for immediate use. Bread, Biscuits, and Pancakes, beautifully light and wholesome, can be made in two minutes! Warranted superior to all others. Will keep good in any climate. For sale by Grocers and Druggists, who will procure them for you, or send an order to

THOS. ANDREWS & CO.,

136 and 138 Cedar Street, N. Y.

BRODIE'S
Stock of Spring
and
Summer
MANTILLAS,
Now Ready for
Wholesale Cash Buyers,
at the
OLD STAND,
300 Canal Street, New York.

ENTERPRISING AGENTS ARE DOING well selling DOWNER'S PAT. HEMMER and SHIELD for Hand-Sewing, and other new articles of ready sale. Profits are large. Samples sent free on receipt of the price (25c.). Send 3-cent stamp for price-list and terms. A. H. DOWNER, 442 Broadway, N. Y.

DO YOU WANT LUXURIANT WHISKERS OR MUSTACHES?—My Onguent will force them to grow heavily in six weeks (upon the smoothest face) without stain or injury to the skin. Price $1—sent by mail, post free, to any address, on receipt of an order.   R. G. GRAHAM, No. 109 Nassau Street, N. Y.

$1.24 procures, postage prepaid, ATWATER'S PATENT PRESS AND BOOK for Copying Business Letters instantly and perfectly. Thousands already sold. Agents wanted. Profits, sales, and satisfaction good. Send stamp for particulars. J. H. Atwater, Box 116, Providence, R. I.

Bound Volumes

   AND

      Back Numbers

OF

Harper's Weekly

Always on hand.

Price of Volumes in Cloth    $3.50

" " Half Morocco    5.50
Beautifully and substantially bound.

HARPER & BROTHERS,

   Franklin Square, N. Y.

HARPER'S

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

"The Adventures of Philip" will probably be completed in May. It will be succeeded by another Serial Tale from a favorite Writer, for which engagements have been made. Mr. J. Ross BROWNE, who is now traveling in Europe, will furnish a series of articles, illustrated by himself, describing his journey through Norway. These will be commenced in an early Number. Mr. LOSSING will continue the series of papers upon events in our National History, which have not been treated in detail by our standard historians. The Personal Sketches of Eminent Americans, by Dr. WYNNE, will comprise anecdotes and reminiscences of most of the men who have acquired an acknowledged representative position in our Literature and Science.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE contains nearly twice the amount of matter of the "Cornhill," "Blackwood," "Fraser," "Macmillan," and other leading English Magazines. It contains from twenty-five to one hundred per cent. more than any other American periodical of similar class.

 

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year .................................................$3.00

Two Copies for One Year ..............................................5.00

Three or more Copies for One Year (each) .................2.00
And an Extra Copy, gratis, ,for every Club of EIGHT SUBSCRIBERS.

 

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00.

Clergymen and Teachers supplied at the lowest CLUB RATES.

The DEMAND NOTES of the United States will be received for Subscriptions. Our distant friends are requested to remit them in preference to Bank Notes.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

   FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

Single Copies Six Cents.

A Thrilling Story,
Entitled,

NO NAME.

By Wilkie Collins,
AUTHOR OF
"The Woman in White,"
Richly Illustrated by John McLellan,
Was commenced in the Number for March 15 (No. 272) of

HARPER'S WEEKLY,
And will be continued from week to week until completed.

TERMS.

One Copy for One Year ..................$2.50

One Copy for Two Years ................4.00

Ten Copies for One Year ..............18.00

An Extra Copy will be allowed for every Club of TEN SUBSCRIBERS.

 

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00.

HARPER'S WEEKLY will be sent gratuitously for one month—as a specimen—to any one who applies for it.

HARPER'S WEEKLY is electrotyped, and Back Numbers can he had at any time.

Vols. . I., II., III., IV., and V., for the Years 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, and 1861, of "HARPER'S WEEKLY," handsomely bound in Cloth extra, Price $3.50 each, are now ready.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

   FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

Picture
Picture
Picture

 

 

  

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