Slave Torture

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, February 15, 1862

We have been collecting Harper's Weekly Civil War Newspapers for over 20 years. We are pleased to make these historical documents available online for your research and study. These old newspaper provide perspective on the War that is simply not available anywhere else.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

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Foreign Intervention

Trent Affair

British Respond to Trent Affair

Merrimac

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Map Hatteras Inlet

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"Nashville" and "Tuscarora"

Slave Torture

Slave Torture

Hatteras Inlet

Hatteras Inlet

British Atrocities

British Atrocities in India

British Atrocities

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Disaster of the Burnside Expedition

Disaster of the Burnside Expedition

William Russell Cartoon

William Russell Carton

 

Shipwreck

Shipwreck of the "City of New York"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[FEBRUARY 15, 1862.

108

BLOODY FIGHT AT OCCOQUAN, VIRGINIA.—[SKETCHED BY MR. A. R. WAUD.]

FIGHT AT OCCOQUAN, VA.

ABOVE we illustrate the recent FIGHT AT OCCOQUAN, from a sketch by our own correspondent. The Times dispatch said:

Rev. Mr. Weston, of Trinity Church, has brought in the particulars of a foray upon a gang of rebels on the Occoquan. He says they were holding a carousal in the house of one Porter, an old man., when they were surrounded by the detail of fifty men, and refusing to surrender, the firing commenced, and was continued until every rebel except two was killed. These two were Porter, who fought desperately to the last, and a young man who had been fiddling for the party. This latter was a citizen of Washington, and claimed to be a Union man, but was doubtless a spy, who had taken information from Washington to the

rebels. The number killed was ten—nine Texan Rangers and one citizen who was present.

AN INSTRUMENT OF TORTURE
AMONG SLAVEHOLDERS.

ON this page we publish an illustration of an INSTRUMENT OF TORTURE used among the slave-holders of Missouri. The correspondent who sends us the sketch writes

MONTGOMERY CITY. MISSOURI, January 24, 1862.

I send you the sketch of an instrument used by the secession slave-masters of Missouri to punish their negroes.

Not long since one of these wretched victims came within our lines with an instrument of this description round his neck. It was securely riveted there, and required an hour's filing before it could be removed. This proved to be a very painful operation to the poor "contraband;" for his neck was so snugly incased by the iron band, and the instrument was of such a peculiar shape, as to render the operation difficult of accomplishment. The negro stated that he had worn it two months, and this statement has been corroborated by reliable Union men at the same county. The form of the instrument prevented him from lying down and taking his rest at night; and its weight and close fit rendered it very burdensome during the day. It consisted of a heavy iron ring, fitting closely round the neck, from which extended three prongs, each two feet in length, with a ring on the end. I suppose the design of the instrument was that a chain should be attached to it, and thus secure the victim beyond all possible hope of escape;

but this negro had been running loose, with the thing round his neck, for two months; and finally, ascertaining that Federal soldiers were near, speedily repaired to them for deliverance from his tormentor. Of course he found the deliverance which he sought, and the instrument of torment is preserved by us as a mournful example of the deep degradation to which the soul, tainted by secession, may descend. It is needless to say that we did not send the negro back to his master, but so far as we were concerned, left him perfectly free to do his own will. The name of the person who has thus proved himself destitute of all humanity is Dudley Wells, of Montgomery County, Missouri. He is now a prisoner, held as a traitor to his country, and awaiting the punishment due his crime; and if he does not receive it at an earthly tribunal he certainly will at the tribunal of an outraged conscience.   

   Sergeant CAHRLES O. DEWEY,

Dodge's Battery, 4th Regiment Iowa Volunteers.

WESTON'S CROSS-ROADS, NEAR COLUMBUS, OCCUPIED BY TAYLOR'S CHICAGO ARTILLERY.

INSTRUMENT OF TORTURE USED BY SLAVEHOLDERS.

Occuquan Virginia
Weston's Cross Roads
Slave Torture

 

 

  

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