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Civil War Harper's Weekly, March 1, 1862

We are making our extensive collection of original Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers available to you online. This collection allows in depth research and analysis of key issues of the Civil War. We are hopeful you find this material useful.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Fort Donelson

Battle of Fort Donelson

Capture of Fort Donelson

Capture of Fort Donelson

Rebel Pirates

Rebel Pirates

Savannah River

Gunboats on the Savannah River

Albemarle and Pamlico Map

Map of Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds

Roanoke Island

Battle of Roanoke Island

Goldsborough

Flag Officer Goldsborough

Ft. Henry

Capture of Fort Henry

Roanoke Island

Roanoke Island Battle

Foster and Porter

Captain Porter and General Foster

Somerset and Green River

Somerset and Green River

Uncle Sam

Uncle Sam Cartoon

 

 

MARCH 1, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

141

CAMP OF FOURTH KENTUCKY REGIMENT, NEAR SOMERSET, KY., LATELY OCCUPIED BY SEVENTEENTH TENNESSEE REGIMENT (REBEL).—[SKETCHED BY MR. OSCAR D. KRESS.]

(Previous Page) old Government, in the service of which his father spent his life. Laying aside all personal considerations, he tendered his aid putting down the rebellion, and was assigned to a boat which has beer built chiefly under his superintendence. He christened it, after his father's ship, the Essex. At the battle of Fort Henry Captain Porter ran up

within one hundred and fifty yards of the fort, and fought with daring and effect until he was scalded by the fatal ball which entered at one of the bow-ports, passing through the boiler. He was blown out of the same port, and would have been lost but for the heroic daring of a seaman, John Walker, who rushed through the scalding steam after him,

and caught him just as he was going overboard, and carried him aft along the outer-guard, a space just nine inches in width. Of this act the Captain speaks in the most grateful terms.

The Captain had the presence of mind to close his mouth and eyes, so that his scald is not serious. He is under the very tender and efficient care of

Surgeon Thomas Rice, who proved his skill by the manner in which he attended the wounded on board the Essex after and during the battle.

It is hoped that the Captain's face will not be disfigured. He says he went into the fight with high colors, and though disabled, the stars and stripes still waved as he floated back.

GENERAL MITCHELL'S DIVISION CROSSING GREEN RIVER, KENTUCKY, OCTOBER 10, 1862.—SKETCHED BY MR. H. MOSLER.—[SEE PAGE 130.]

Somerset Kentucky
Picture

 

 

  

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