Colonel Robert Shaw

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 15, 1863

This site features the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. The material allows you to examine details of the War not available from modern publications. These newspapers will take you back in time to the days the war was still raging on.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

John Morgan's Raid

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Seabrook Island

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Colonel Shaw

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Capture of Jackson

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Remington Revolver Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

AUGUST 15, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

525

THE LATE BRIGADIER-GENERAL GEORGE C. STRONG.—[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

THE LATE COLONEL ROBERT G. SHAW.—[SEE NEXT PAGE.]

THE LATE GENERAL GEORGE
C. STRONG.

WE publish on this page a portrait—from a photograph by Brady—of the late GENERAL STRONG, who died in this city on 30th ult., from the results of a wound received in the recent attack on Fort Wagner.

George C. Strong was born at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, in 1836, entered West Point in 1853, and graduated in 1857. He entered the Ordnance Department, and on the outbreak of the rebellion was in command of the Watervliet Arsenal. He applied for active employment, was placed on the

staff of General McDowell, and served in that capacity at the battle of Bull Run. served for a short time on the staff of General McClellan, but was soon transferred to General Butler, and proceeded to organize the Butler expedition. He was stationed for some time in Boston and vicinity, and sailed for the Gulf, arriving at Ship Island March 24, 1862. When New Orleans was taken he removed his office to that city, and transacted the business of the Department of the Gulf. The labor and exertion attendant upon his position nearly cost him his life, which for some time was despaired of, but a compulsory visit to the North restored him to health. As chief of General Butler's

staff he conducted several expeditions to Biloxi and up the Mississippi, and thus betrayed a character for gallantry that only wanted the opportunity to develop itself.

He returned to the North with General Butler, and after a brief period of inactivity was, at the request of General Gilmore, placed in command of a brigade in the Department of the South. He had previously been appointed Brigadier-General, on the recommendation of General Butler. The following, from the Herald correspondence, will show how he commenced his work:

During the early part of the army movements under General Gilmore to General Strong's brigade was awarded

the post of honor, as may be gathered from the following extract from general orders:

SPECIAL ORDERS—No. 9.

July 9, 1863.

The attack on Morris Island will take place tomorrow morning at break of day, by opening our batteries at the north end of Folly Island. General Strong's brigade will embark to-night, and hold itself in Folly Island Creek ready to move forward, and at the proper time occupy the south end of Morris Island.

The brigade landed in due order, and, with General Strong and staff at their head, the advance kept on long after they got under the rebel fire. The General, who had fallen into the water, after he got his ducking pulled off his riding-boots to pour out the water, and was too eager to get on to stop and put them on; so he headed the charge with only stockings on, and in that state led the troops

GENERAL QUINCY A. GILMORE.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY HAAS.—[SEE NEXT PAGE.]

CAPTAIN JOHN RODGERS, OF THE "WEEHAWKEN."—[SEE PAGE 519.]

General George Strong
Colonel Shaw
Picture
Picture

 

 

 

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