The Flagship "Hartford"

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 29, 1863

This site presents an online archive of all the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These papers will take you back in time to the days the war was being fought. It give details of the attitudes and issues of the day, as they happened.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

David Farragut

David Farragut

Draft Editorial

Draft Editorial

Soldier's Letter

A Soldier's Letter

The Hartford

The "Hartford"

Black Soldier's Funeral

Black Soldier's Funeral

Prisoners in New Orleans

New Orleans Prisoners

Draft Resistance

Draft Resistance

Fort Wagner

Bombardment of Fort Wagner

Dumfries

Dumfries, Virginia

Balck Troops at Fort Wagner

Black Troops Before Fort Wagner

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[AUGUST 29, 1863.

548

THE "HARTFORD," ADMIRAL FARRAGUT'S FLAGSHIP, ARRIVING AT NEW YORK AND RETURNING THE SALUTES OF FOREIGN FRIGATES.[SEE PAGE 546.]

A TORPEDO IN THE JAMES
RIVER.

WE publish below an illustration of the explosion of a torpedo under the gun-boat Commodore Barney, in the James River, on 4th August.

General Foster was making a reconnoissance up the river with the Commodore Barney, the Sangamon, and the Cohasset. They had already been

fired upon by riflemen on the river-bank. The Herald correspondent goes on to describe the event illustrated in our picture:

No other incident of an exciting nature transpired until the fleet had reached a point on the river within six miles of Fort Darling. Here, as usual, the Barney bore the brunt of the misfortune. A torpedo was exploded under her starboard bow. The effect of this explosion was terrific in appearance, but, luckily, did not turn out so bad

after all. The vessel was lifted by the shock upward of ten feet out of water, and an immense jet of water was hurled from her bow fifty feet in the air at least, falling over and completely deluging her, and washing overboard thirty men. Notwithstanding the desperate condition of affairs boats were immediately manned, and the unfortunates were rescued by their faithful brethren from a watery grave. Two of these men only, named Martin Krout, seaman, and I. Gamble (colored) were drowned. The rest were picked up. Two or three swam ashore.

It was now discovered that the Barney was badly injured; as much so that it was found necessary to point her head for the shore. The Cohasset, however, took her in tow shortly, it being found that her engines were completely disabled. A further advance was now considered useless, inasmuch as the men seen on shore were there, doubtless, for the purpose of exploding the torpedoes beneath our vessels as they attempted to pass. So the expedition returned to Dutch Gap, where anchors were dropped for the night.

EXPLOSION OF A TORPEDO UNDER THE BOW OF THE UNITED STATES GUN-BOAT "COMMODORE BARNEY," IN THE JAMES RIVER.

[SKETCHED FROM THE "COHASSET."]

The Hartford
Commodore Barney

 

 

 

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